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In our application we have some strings coming from translation that can contain variables. For example in Can i have a {beverage}? the {beverage} part should be replaced with a variable. My current implementation works by having a Dictionary of the name and value of all variables, and just replacing the correct string. However i'd like to register the variables by reference, so that if the value is ever changed the resulting string is changed as well. Usually passing a parameter with the ref keyword would do the trick, but i'm unsure on how to store those in a Dictionary.

TranslationParser:

static class TranslationParser
{
    private const string regex = "{([a-z]+)}";
    private static Dictionary<string, object> variables = new Dictionary<string,object>();

    public static void RegisterVariable(string name, object value)
    {
        if (variables.ContainsKey(name))
            variables[name] = value;
        else
            variables.Add(name, value);
    }

    public static string ParseText(string text)
    {
        return Regex.Replace(text, regex, match =>
        {
            string varName = match.Groups[1].Value;

            if (variables.ContainsKey(varName))
                return variables[varName].ToString();
            else
                return match.Value;
        });
    }
}

main.cs

        string bev = "cola";
        TranslationParser.RegisterVariable("beverage", bev);
        //Expected: "Can i have a cola?"
        Console.WriteLine(TranslationParser.ParseText("Can i have a {beverage}?")); 
        bev = "fanta";
        //Expected: "Can i have a fanta?"
        Console.WriteLine(TranslationParser.ParseText("Can i have a {beverage}?")); 

Is this possible at all, or am i just approaching the problem incorrectly? I fear that the only solution would involve unsafe code (pointers).

So in short, i'd like to store a variable in a Dictionary, change the original variable and get the changed value from the Dictionary. Like you would do with the ref keyword.

share|improve this question
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rope_(computer_science) may be of interest. – Dave Bish Apr 27 '12 at 11:51
    
@DaveBish You're a fast reader! But that article seems to be about storage, which isnt a problem. The strings come from an xml file, and arent included in the binary. – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 11:52
    
And string operations seem to be going fine, i'd just like to store a reference in a dictionary basicly. – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 11:55
    
@TJHeuvel - Your question is unclear. – Ramhound Apr 27 '12 at 12:10
    
I'm sorry, in short my question would be: Can i store values by reference in a Dictionary. – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 12:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another way to use wrappers. You can wrap your variables every time when you regiester them.

class ObjectWrapper
{
    private object _value;

    public ObjectWrapper(object value) 
    {
        _value = value;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _value.ToString();
    }
}

static class TranslationParser
{
    private const string regex = "{([a-z]+)}";
    private static Dictionary<string, ObjectWrapper> variables = new Dictionary<string, ObjectWrapper>();

    public static void RegisterVariable(string name, object value)
    {
        var wrapped = new ObjectWrapper(value);
        if (variables.ContainsKey(name))
            variables[name] = wrapped;
        else
            variables.Add(name, wrapped);
    }

    public static string ParseText(string text)
    {
        return Regex.Replace(text, regex, match =>
        {
            string varName = match.Groups[1].Value;

            if (variables.ContainsKey(varName))
                return variables[varName].ToString();
            else
                return match.Value;
        });
    }
}

Edit:

But actually, I think it's impossible without unsafe code to track variables in a way that you want to do. Value-types and references to reference-type stored in stack, and if you just replace reference, it will not affect to real object in heap (reference to that object you store in the dictionary). So that you need to have references (say pointers) to stack memory.

Edit again: I was wrong!

It is possible to track any varaible using expressions:

class Wrapper
{
    private readonly Dictionary<string, MemberExpression> _registrations = 
        new Dictionary<string, MemberExpression>();

    public void Register<T>(string name, Expression<Func<T>> expr)
    {
        _registrations[name] = (MemberExpression)expr.Body;
    }

    public object GetValue(string name)
    {
        var expr = _registrations[name];
        var fieldInfo = (FieldInfo)expr.Member;
        var obj = ((ConstantExpression)expr.Expression).Value;
        return fieldInfo.GetValue(obj);
    }
}
private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var wrapper = new Wrapper();
    int x = 0;
    storage.Register("x", () => x);
    Console.WriteLine(wrapper.GetValue("x")); //0
    x = 1;
    Console.WriteLine(wrapper.GetValue("x")); //1
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that is as rich.okelly also suggested. Tested and works (upvoted as well ;)). However its rather vebose, but if its the only way that'll do. – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 12:20
    
I was wondering why there is a difference as well, is it because custom classes are Reference types and System.String is a value type? – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 12:21
    
Thanks for the clear answer :) – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 13:49
    
@TJHeuvel, found a way to track variables without unsafe code :) Check out my update please, if you're still interested in... – 2kay Dec 13 '12 at 14:16

In the code provided I see

string bev = "cola";
TranslationParser.RegisterVariable("beverage", bev);
//Expected: "Can i have a cola?"
Console.WriteLine(TranslationParser.ParseText("Can i have a {beverage}?")); 
bev = "fanta";
//Expected: "Can i have a fanta?"

that first you regitser the substitude of the {beverage} like a "cola", but after want to change it at runtime to another one: "fanta". Thie leads me to think: why do not just a ParseText function to accept an optional parameter, which will "win" against saved one ?

Like this:

public static string ParseText(string text, string preferedValue=null)
{
        return Regex.Replace(text, regex, match =>
        {
            string varName = match.Groups[1].Value;

            if (variables.ContainsKey(varName))
            {
                if(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(preferedValue)) //IF THERE ISPREFERED VALUE                                                         
                       return preferedValue;             //RETURN THAT ONE

                return variables[varName].ToString();
            }
            else
                return match.Value;
        });
}
share|improve this answer
    
That would be sort of the same as the regular String.Format. The thing is i dont want to know all the variables in one place, every class of the application could register new variables, and every other class could get a translation. – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 12:05
    
Thanks for the suggestion though :) – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 12:07
    
@TJHeuvel: ok, but looking on post you see you would like to have additional flexibility, so in case when default translated value for one of the consumers of Translator is not ok, it can specify what is more approriate to him? Isn't this correct? – Tigran Apr 27 '12 at 12:07
    
I'd like translated strings to have variables in them. So that our dutch translator could fill in "Mag ik {beverage}?", and the English could translate it to "Can i have a {beverage} please?". This works, however i'd like the variables to be passed as reference. So that if i change the value the translation would reflect it. – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 12:17
    
@rich.okelly nailed it, thats exactly what i want. – TJHeuvel Apr 27 '12 at 12:18

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