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Is it possible to use typedef on a std container without specializing it?

Code like this works:

typedef std::vector<int> intVector;

But for this code:

template <typename T>
typedef std::vector<T> DynamicArray<T>;

I get an error:

template declaration of 'typedef'

It is possible to do this in C++??

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Considering that all you're basically doing is renaming std::vector, how untasteful would it be to use #define DynamicArray std::vector? –  suszterpatt Apr 27 '12 at 14:07
    
@suszterpatt - true, but I try to keep it modern and avoid usage of the unsafe macros :) –  ddriver Apr 27 '12 at 14:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, in C++11.

template <typename T>
using DynamicArray = std::vector<T>;

(Not that you should use this exact alias.)

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It doesn't seem to be working in Visual Studio 2010 SP1. I get "unrecognisable template declaration/definition" I suppose it is not supported by MS yet? –  ddriver Apr 27 '12 at 13:55
1  
@ddriver: No, it's not. And not by VC11, either, AFAIR. If you want C++11, use GCC or Clang. –  Cat Plus Plus Apr 27 '12 at 13:58
    
I found a workaround for VS by simply inheriting vector. Please see the answer I added and shed some light if this is not a good idea. Thanks! –  ddriver Apr 27 '12 at 15:03

If your compiler support c++11:

template <typename T>
using DynamicArray = std::vector<T>;

otherwise (c++98 or older) you can use a help structure like the following

template<typename T>
struct DynamicArray
{
  typedef std::vector<T> type;
};

and then use it as

DynamicArray<int>::type my_array;

Inheriting from std::vector is a possible solution but be aware that STL containers do not have virtual destructor. i.e.:

template <typename T>
struct DynamicArray: vector<T> { ... };

int main() {
  vector<int>* p = new DynamicArray<int>();
  delete p; // this is Undefined Behavior
  return 0;
}
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Yes, but why would I dynamically allocate a vector when it is using dynamic memory allocation for its data internally? –  ddriver Apr 27 '12 at 15:31
    
Also, can't I just write a destructor myself, I think the vector's destructor should be responsible for its data, I only need to take care of extra stuff I added. I might be wrong thou, I am not too good with C++. –  ddriver Apr 27 '12 at 15:35
    
I mean, sure, there might be problems with polymorphic usage, but since the intent is to just use the derived class I don't think there will be any problems due to the lack of virtual destructor. I mean it is not like I am going to call delete on a pointer to vector which actually points to a DynamicArray, which also has no extra dynamically allocated members to require extra care. Please correct me if I am wrong. Thanks! –  ddriver Apr 27 '12 at 15:48
    
@ddriver You are right, if you are sure you never delete such a pointer you are good. –  log0 Apr 27 '12 at 16:10
    
and if I delete from a vector pointer, what would the implications of that be if I don't have any extra members in my derived class? –  ddriver Apr 27 '12 at 16:17

This syntax is invalid in C++, there is no feature like a "template typedef".

template <typename T>
typedef std::vector<T> DynamicArray<T>;

However, C++11 introduces a template alias syntax that is almost like this:

template <typename T>
using DynamicArray =  std::vector<T>;

In C++03 you can use a template metafunction like:

template<class T>
struct DynamicArray
{
    typedef std::vector<T> type;
};
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The common solution (if you're not using C++ 11) is to do this:

template<class T>
struct DynamicArray
{
    typedef std::vector<T> Type;
};

And use it as DynamicArray<Something>::Type.

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To add my own solution to the mix

Since the C++11 feature is not supported by Visual Studio I decided to just inherit std::vector, using this to add some functionality:

template <typename T>
class DynamicArray : public std::vector<T> {
public:
    DynamicArray& operator<<(const T& value)
    {
        push_back(value);
        return *this;
    }
};

Now besides push_back, chaining is also supported:

DynamicArray<int> array;
array << 1 << 2 << 3 << 4 << 5 << 6;

I don't know if such an approach may have some unintended drawbacks, so if you are aware of some, please do share them!

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1  
Inheriting from standard containers do have some drawbacks ... (conf. my answer) Did you consider implementing free functions instead ? DynamicArray& operator<<(const DynamicArray& arr, const T& value) –  log0 Apr 27 '12 at 15:18

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