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Found someone has similar issue online here.

This doesn't work:

Timer t = new Timer(false);
t.schedule(new TimerTask() {
@Override
public void run() {
Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "msg", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
}
}, 5000);

But if I instantiate the toast outside the timertask then show it inside run,it works.

I think it may relate to the so-called UI thread,

but how exactly ?

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You cannot use Toast or make any UI updates from a non UI-thread. –  Eng.Fouad Apr 27 '12 at 14:22
    
@Eng.Fouad, any more details? –  new_perl Apr 27 '12 at 14:24
1  
look at the end of this page, specially where it says: Make sure that you access the Android UI toolkit only on the UI thread. –  Eng.Fouad Apr 27 '12 at 14:30
    
@Eng.Fouad,I'm seeking of more internal reason –  new_perl May 4 '12 at 16:43

3 Answers 3

try this

Timer t = new Timer(false);
t.schedule(new TimerTask() {
@Override
public void run() {
       runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "msg", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
            }
        });

    }
}, 5000);
share|improve this answer
    
I know there're several ways to make it work,but I just don't know why the original way does NOT work, and why it works if toast is created outside. –  new_perl Apr 27 '12 at 14:19
    
Almost perfect, but you shouldn't be using the ApplicationContext for a Toast, you should be using the Activity. –  StackOverflowed Jul 8 '12 at 12:39

Using Timer starts a new thread, I suppose that thread does not have access to getApplicationContext. The proper way to do it is to use Handler and call the postDelayed method of the Handler - which does not start a new thread.

Read about this: http://developer.android.com/resources/articles/timed-ui-updates.html

The link you posted has a working example, which is the proper way to do it:

final Context ctx = this;
Handler mHandler = new Handler();

Runnable
makeToast = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        Toast.makeText(ctx, "msg", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
    }
};
mHandler.postDelayed(makeToast, 1000);
share|improve this answer
    
I also tried ActivityClassName.this, it also doesn't work, why? –  new_perl Apr 27 '12 at 14:21

Everytime you start an application, it starts on the UI Thread (also called the Main Thread).

Whenever you create a new Thread, or Timer, or AsyncTask, by definition, they're creating new Threads. Threads that aren't the main thread simply don't have permission to modify the UI.

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