Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have the following Classes / Interfaces:

// Model
public class A : IA { }
// ModelLogic
public class B : IB<A> { }

// Model Interface
public interface IA { }
// ModelLogic Interface
public interface IB<T> where T : IA { }

I try to create a new instance using the following code:

IB<IA> foo = new B();

I am getting the following error:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'B' to 'IB<IA>'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

Can someone please explain why this is not possible?

share|improve this question
    
What version of C# are you using? –  Oded Apr 27 '12 at 14:34
3  
Covariance and Contravariance FAQ and this blog series by Eric Lippert –  Oded Apr 27 '12 at 14:35
1  
B is an IB<A>, not an IB<IA>. –  Servy Apr 27 '12 at 14:39

3 Answers 3

OK, let's replace A with Fish, IA with IAnimal, B with Aquarium, and IB<T> with IContainer<T>. And we'll add a member to IContainer<T>, and a second implementation of IAnimal:

// Model
public class Fish : IAnimal { }
public class Tiger : IAnimal { }
// ModelLogic
public class Aquarium : IContainer<Fish> 
{ 
    public Fish Contents { get; set; }
}

// Model Interface
public interface IAnimal { }
// ModelLogic Interface
public interface IContainer<T> where T : IAnimal 
{ 
    T Contents { get; set; }
}

IContainer<IAnimal> foo = new Aquarium(); // Why is this illegal?
foo.Contents = new Tiger(); // Because this is legal!

You can put a Tiger into foo -- foo is typed as a container that can contain any animal. But you can only put a Fish into an Aquarium. Since the operations you can legally perform on an Aquarium are different than the operations you can perform on an IContainer<IAnimal>, the types are not compatible.

The feature you want is called generic interface covariance and it is supported by C# 4, but you have to prove to the compiler that you will never put a tiger into your fish tank. What you want to do is:

// Model
public class A : IA { }
// ModelLogic
public class B : IB<A> { }

// Model Interface
public interface IA { }
// ModelLogic Interface
public interface IB<out T> where T : IA { }

Notice the covariance annotation on IB. This out means that T can only be used as an output, not as an input. If T is only an output then there is no way for someone to put a tiger into that fish tank because there is no "put into" property or method possible.

I wrote a number of blog articles while we were adding that feature to C#; if you are interested in the design considerations that went into the feature, see:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/tags/covariance+and+contravariance/

share|improve this answer
    
Invalid variance: The type parameter 'T' must be invariantly valid on 'xx.IContainer<T>.Contents'. 'T' is covariant. I am getting this error. I am new to covariant stuff. What does the error mean? –  Sandeep Apr 27 '12 at 15:13
3  
@Sandeep: You are somehow using T in an input position when you have said that you are only going to use it in an output position. Is Contents a property with a setter? If it is then clearly T is being used in an input position, and therefore the interface cannot be made covariant in T. –  Eric Lippert Apr 27 '12 at 15:18
    
Thanks Eric. That solved it. –  Sandeep Apr 27 '12 at 17:08

It's not easy to see when you have empty interfaces. Consider you have one method M in interface IB:

public interface IB<T> where T : IA 
{ 
    void M(T t); 
}

And here is implementation of B:

public class B : IB<A>
{
    public void M(A t)
    {
        // only object of type A accepted 
    }
}

Then you have object C, which also implements IA:

public class C : IA { } 

So, if your code would be possible, then you could call:

IB<IA> foo = new B();
foo.M(new C());

Problem is that class B accepts only objects of type A. Error!

share|improve this answer

To fix your code, just change

public interface IB<T> where T : IA { }

to

public interface IB<out T> where T : IA { }
share|improve this answer
    
awww, Eric beat me to it :) –  CodingWithSpike Apr 27 '12 at 14:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.