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Using PostgreSQL 9.0, I have a group role called "staff" and would like to grant all (or certain) privileges to this role on tables in a particular schema. None of the following work

GRANT ALL ON SCHEMA foo TO staff;
GRANT ALL ON DATABASE mydb TO staff;

Members of "staff" are still unable to SELECT or UPDATE on the individual tables in the schema "foo" or (in the case of the second command) to any table in the database unless I grant all on that specific table.

What can I do make my and my users' lives easier?

Update: Figured it out with the help of a similar question on serverfault.com.

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA foo TO staff;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 29 down vote accepted

The solution you found is the shorthand to set privileges for existing objects. What about new objects?

You'll also be interested in DEFAULT PRIVILEGES for users or schemas:

ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES IN SCHEMA foo GRANT SELECT ON TABLES TO staff;
ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES IN SCHEMA foo REVOKE ...;

ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES FOR staff IN SCHEMA foo GRANT ...;
ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES FOR staff IN SCHEMA foo REVOKE ...;

This will set privileges automatically for objects created in the future - and not affect already-existing objects.

Note that default privileges are only applied to objects created by the targeted user (FOR ROLE target_role). If that clause is omitted, it applies to the current user.

Note also that the current version 1.18.1 of pgAdmin (default GUI) has a subtle bug and displays default privileges in the SQL pane, even if they do not apply to the current user.

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just so you know Erwin, 10 mins after you posted your advice, I needed it. Its like you knew what I was going to do... create a new table and find it didn't have the right privs. Your answer came to the rescue. –  punkish Apr 27 '12 at 17:23
2  
@punkish: I demand my precog badge! Damn, that's already used for something else. –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 28 '12 at 12:14

My answer is similar to this one on ServerFault.com.

To Be Conservative

If you want to be more conservative than granting "all privileges", you might want to try something more like these.

GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA public TO some_user_;
GRANT EXECUTE ON ALL FUNCTIONS IN SCHEMA public TO some_user_;

The use of public there refers to the name of the default schema created for every new database/catalog. Replace with your own name if you created a schema.

Existing Objects Versus Future

These commands only affect existing objects. Tables and such you create in the future get default privileges until you re-execute those lines above. See the other answer by Erwin Brandstetter to change the defaults thereby affecting future objects.

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