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I am creating a message-based architecture that currently uses polling clients to retrieve messages. For obvious reasons, I would like to register my clients to SQL Server 2008 in order to receive an event when a message is inserted into a table.

I have been round-and-round the web researching SQL Server Message Broker, CLR Stored Procedures, and StreamInsight, but I can't seem to find what I am looking for: a way for SQL Server to alert my services that a message has been received. Basically an event-driven rather than polling model.

Does this exist? Any ideas on where to start? Are there any examples?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, this does exist. I've had success using SQL Service Broker. I'm unfamiliar with the other options you listed.

Setting up SSB is a pain because there are so many moving parts and details but it works nicely. The main part that helps you avoid polling is a stored procedure that you create and call from C#. In that short procedure is a RECEIVE WAITFOR statement which blocks your open and transacted connection until a message is available in your queue OR your timeout hits. In C#, whether you get a result or a timeout immediately run the procedure again to wait for the next item.

You'll want to limit the number of open connections you have to SQL ... to 1 if possible. If you have multiple interested parties, push all their stuff through that one connection and distribute it with a C# server by some other means.

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Thank you very much! I have read about the RECEIVE WAITFOR, but I was hoping that I could register a WCF endpoint that I could call within a trigger. I do not like the idea of blocking a thread and keeping a DB connection open. I think I will just use a polling-client since I will have at least three different clients checking for messages; each of those will have at lease 2 instances on different machines for scaling and failover. This is an enterprise application. I could use a single client to use the RECEIVE WAITFOR, but one means one point of failure; which I definitely do't want. –  NickV Apr 27 '12 at 15:52
    
Well, an open connection is not so bad. It's not a "real" thing, and there's no traffic over it while waiting. SQL can't push out, so you're left with this or polling (as you know) and polling is more traffic and perhaps MORE open connections over the course of a day, depending on your event frequency and minimum resolution. –  uosɐſ Apr 27 '12 at 17:15
    
Sounds good. I like the point about 'more trafic and perhaps MORE open connections over the course of the day.' I do not expect much wait time at all! –  NickV Apr 27 '12 at 17:31
    
Nice to know. Thanks! –  SoMoS Apr 30 '12 at 9:49
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