Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hello im just beginning to learn C and i want to know why im getting a problem here.. i wish to pass a char pointer

char *temp;

into a function ie call to function

checkIfUniqueCourseNo(temp,k);

with a prototype

int checkIfUniqueCourseNo(char checkchar[4],int);

and a function header

int checkIfUniqueCourseNo(char checkchar[4], int k)

Im sure im doing something really stupid here but im not sure how to fix it :( thanks in advance. ps my error is that checkchar[4] outputs a P...

Example---

temp = "123A"
checkIfUniqueCourseNo(temp,k);

int checkIfUniqueCourseNo(char checkchar[4], int k){
    printf("CheckifUniqueCourse\n");
    printf("Check Value = %c \n", checkchar);

    return 0;
}

Output = Check Value = P

share|improve this question
5  
"outputs a P" - what does that mean? Please clarify what the error is. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 27 '12 at 14:43
    
so when i printf checkchar form my checkIfUniqueCourseNo function. it outputs a p. @OliCharlesworth –  Daniel D C Apr 27 '12 at 14:45
1  
What do you expect to happen? "it outputs a p" doesn't give us any clue as to what the problem is. What's it supposed to output? What does the code actually do? Without this information, we can't be of any help. –  John Bode Apr 27 '12 at 14:46
1  
If you do printf("%c", checkchar[0]); then you've asked to print only one character. If you do printf("%s", checkchar); it might be an error if checkchar is not zero-terminated. –  Agent_L Apr 27 '12 at 14:53
1  
Thanks @Agent_L thats was my problem ! i was outputing it wrong. sorry about the bad question description –  Daniel D C Apr 27 '12 at 14:57

4 Answers 4

temp = "123A" 
checkIfUniqueCourseNo(temp,k);  

int checkIfUniqueCourseNo(char checkchar[4], int k){
  printf("CheckifUniqueCourse\n");
  printf("Check Value = %c \n", checkchar);
                                ^^^^^^^^^
  return 0; 
} 

If you're trying to print out the first character of checkchar, then you need to change this line to either

printf("Check Value = %c\n", *checkchar);

or

printf("Check Value = %c\n", checkchar[0]);

In the context of a function parameter declaration, T a[N] and T a[] are equivalent to T *a; a is declared as a pointer to T, not an array of T.

When you wrote

printf("Check Value = %c\n", checkchar);

you lied to printf; you said the argument is supposed to be of type char, but you passed a char *. Hence the bogus output.

If you want to print out the entire string "1234", then you need to change that line to

printf("Check value = %s\n", checkchar);

This time we use the %s conversion specifier to tell printf that checkchar points to a 0-terminated array of char (a.k.a. a string).

share|improve this answer
    
%s is dangerous here. When using char[4] one can not bother with terminating string because length is locked to 4. So once unterminated quad is passed (eg. 4CC), you've got runaway printf. –  Agent_L Apr 27 '12 at 15:04
    
@Agent_L: He didn't pass a char[4]; he passed a char * which in this example points to a 0-terminated string. The checkchar parameter is not a 4-element array, despite the array notation; it is a pointer to char, per 6.7.5.3/7. If he's building non-0-terminated arrays of char in his code and not telling us about it, then yes, you're correct. But based on his example and description, I'm not too worried about it. –  John Bode Apr 27 '12 at 15:21
    
Yes, he did - in the example, temp var statically assigned. But I suspect the [4] is there for a reason. –  Agent_L Apr 27 '12 at 15:28

This is not at all clear. Are you assigning any value to temp? If so, what?

It would make more sense to have your prototype as:

int checkIfUniqueCourseNo(char* checkchar, int);

Since it's not at all clear where you got the 4 from.

share|improve this answer
    
the value i am assigning to temp is a char with 4 characters –  Daniel D C Apr 27 '12 at 14:46

It's been a while since I've done C, but I can see a few problems here, temp = "123A" actually requires an array for 5 characters (one of which is to include the '\0' string terminating character).

Secondly, the line printf("Check Value = %c \n", checkchar); seems to be trying to print a memory pointer as a character, change it to the following: printf("Check Value = %s \n", checkchar); and it will output each character in the array until it hits the terminating character.

share|improve this answer

There are a couple of things to look at here, you need to take a good look at the data you have, how it is represented and what you want to do with it.

Your course code appears to be a four character string, you should know that traditionally, strings in C also include an extra byte at the end with the value of zero (NUL) so that the many string functions that exist know that they have reached the end of the string.

In your case, your four digit code takes up five bytes of memory. So wont fit well passing it into your function.

If I were you, I would pass in a pointer like so:-

int checkIfUniqueCourseNo(char* coursecode, int k ) {
  int rv = -1;
  if ( coursecode == NULL ) return rv;
  //...

I have no idea what K is for, do you?

Once you have your sequence of bytes inside your function you can save yourself alot of hastle later by doing some simple bounds checking on the data like so:

  //...
  if ( strlen(coursecode) > 4 ){
    fprintf(stderr,"course code too long\n");
    return rv;
  }

  if ( strlen(coursecode) < 4 ){
    fprintf(stderr,"course code too short\n");
    return rv;
  }
  //...

You can be sure you have a 4 character string now..

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.