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So I have simulated my producer consumer problem and I have the code below. My question is this: how does the consumer stops if he's in constant while(true).

In the code below, I've added

                    if (queue.peek()==null)
                         Thread.currentThread().interrupt();

which works nicely in this example. But in my real world design, this doesn't work (sometimes it takes longer time to the producer to 'put' the data so the exception thrown in the consumer is incorrect. In general, I know I can put a 'poison' data such as Object is XYZ and I can check it in the consumer. But this poison makes the code really look bad. Wonder if anyone has a different approach.

public class ConsumerThread implements Runnable
{
 private BlockingQueue<Integer> queue;
 private String name;
 private boolean isFirstTimeConsuming = true;
 public ConsumerThread(String name, BlockingQueue<Integer> queue)
 {
    this.queue=queue;
    this.name=name;
 }

@Override
public void run()
{
    try
    {       
        while (true)
        {   
            if (isFirstTimeConsuming)
            {
                System.out.println(name+" is initilizing...");
                Thread.sleep(4000);
                isFirstTimeConsuming=false;
            }
            try{

                if (queue.peek()==null)
                    Thread.currentThread().interrupt();

                Integer data = queue.take();

                System.out.println(name+" consumed ------->"+data);
                Thread.sleep(70);    

            }catch(InterruptedException ie)
            {
                System.out.println("InterruptedException!!!!");
                break;
            }
        }

        System.out.println("Comsumer " + this.name + " finished its job; terminating.");

    }catch (InterruptedException e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } 
}

}

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A: There is simply no guarantee that just because peek returns null, the producer has stopped producing. What if the producer simply got slowed down? Now, the consumer quits, and the producer keeps producing. So the 'peek' -> 'break' idea basically fails.

B: Setting a 'done/run' flag from consumer and reading it in producer also fails, if:

  1. consumer checks the flag, finds it should keep running, then does a 'take'
  2. in meanwhile, producer was setting the flag to 'dont run'
  3. Now consumer blocks forever waiting for a ghost packet

The opposite can also happen, and one packet gets left out un-consumed.

Then to get around this, you will want to do additional synchronization with mutexes over and above the 'BlockingQueue'.

C: I find 'Rosetta Code' to be fine source of deciding what is good practice, in situations like this:

http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Synchronous_concurrency#Java

The producer and consumer must agree upon an object (or an attribute in the object) that represents end of input. Then the producer sets that attribute in the last packet, and the consumer stops consuming it. i.e. what you referred to in your question as 'poison'.

In the Rosetta Code example above, this 'object' is simply an empty String called 'EOF':

final String EOF = new String();

// Producer
while ((line = br.readLine()) != null)
  queue.put(line);
br.close();
// signal end of input
queue.put(EOF);

// Consumer
while (true)
  {
    try
      {
        String line = queue.take();
        // Reference equality
        if (line == EOF)
          break;
        System.out.println(line);
        linesWrote++;
      }
    catch (InterruptedException ie)
      {
      }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
yep, this is called 'poison' it works fine, I just wondered if there's a better approach. –  adhg Apr 27 '12 at 15:59
    
@adhg - So the point of my answer was: This seems to be the only simple technique that just works. To me, it also seems to be 'clean' (although, what is 'clean' is really a matter of personal opinion). –  ArjunShankar Apr 27 '12 at 16:15
    
I totally agree with you. I eventually used this solution. Thanks +1 –  adhg Apr 28 '12 at 1:55

Do NOT use interrupt on Thread, but rather break the loop when not needed anymore :

if (queue.peek()==null)
         break;

Or you can also using a variable to mark closing operation pending and then break the loop and close the loop after :

if (queue.peek()==null)
         closing = true;

//Do further operations ...
if(closing)
  break;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, my question is more with respect to 'terminating the thread' and queue.peek()==null will not solve it (it doesn't work in the real problem). Thanks for the tip for not using interrupt. –  adhg Apr 27 '12 at 15:20

If your queue can empty before you'd like your consumer to terminate then you'll need a flag to tell the thread when to stop. Add a setter method so the producer can tell the consumer to shutdown. Then modify your code so that instead of:

if (queue.isEmpty())
   break;

have your code check

if (!run)
{
   break;
}
else if (queue.isEmpty())
{
   Thread.sleep(200);
   continue;
}
share|improve this answer

In the real world, most messaging comes with a header of some sort that defines a message type / sub-type or perhaps different objects.

You can create a command and control object or message type that tells the thread to do something when it gets the message (like shutdown, reload a table, add a new listener, etc.).

This way, you can have say a command and control thread just send messages into the normal message flow. You can have the CNC thread talking to an operational terminal in a large scale system, etc.

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