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I am supposed to follow the following criteria:

Implement function answer4 (pointer parameter and n):

  1. Prepare an array of student_record using malloc() of n items.

  2. Duplicate the student record from the parameter to the array n times.

  3. Return the array.

And I came with the code below, but it's obviously not correct. What's the correct way to implement this?

student_record *answer4(student_record* p, unsigned int n)
{
    int i;
    student_record* q = malloc(sizeof(student_record)*n);
    for(i = 0; i < n ; i++){
        q[i] = p[i];
    }
    free(q);
    return q;
};
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1  
If homework, please tag as homework. It might help to assign something to a. –  bmargulies Apr 27 '12 at 14:59
1  
Note that if you need n instances, then the loop condition should be i<n, and not i<n+1. –  ysap Apr 27 '12 at 15:00
2  
Do you realize that, with your solution, the array will be full of pointers to the same instance ? You're not REALLY duplicating, there. –  Raveline Apr 27 '12 at 15:00
1  
You should remove the semi-colon from after the } that marks the end of the function. The compiler should be warning about a statement that does nothing. If it doesn't, either crank up the warning options or get a better compiler. (For gcc, use -Wall at minimum, and preferably -Wall -Werror. That will head off a lot of problems. Remember, the compiler knows more about C than you do.) –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 27 '12 at 15:05
1  
free(q) and return q ...what? –  r_ahlskog Apr 27 '12 at 16:01

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted
p = malloc(sizeof(student_record)*n);

This is problematic: you're overwriting the p input argument, so you can't reference the data you were handed after that line.

Which means that your inner loop reads initialized data.

This:

return a; 

is problematic too - it would return a pointer to a local variable, and that's not good - that pointer becomes invalid as soon as the function returns.

What you need is something like:

student_record* ret = malloc(...);

for (int i=...) {
 // copy p[i] to ret[i]
}

return ret;
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student_record answer4(student_record p, unsigned int n) { int i; student_record* q = malloc(sizeof(student_record)*n); for(i = 0; i < n ; i++){ q[i] = p[i]; } free(q); return q; }; –  Hwa Soo Cho Apr 27 '12 at 15:12
    
Don't free q! If you do that, you return an invalid pointer to the caller, which is useless. The caller will be responsible for freeing that memory when he/she is done with it. –  Mat Apr 27 '12 at 15:14
    
student_record answer4(student_record p, unsigned int n) { int i; student_record* q = malloc(sizeof(student_record)*n); for(i = 0; i < n ; i++){ q[i] = p[i]; } return q; }; thanks so much for the help. i think this is correct, after i don't free the q. thanks! –  Hwa Soo Cho Apr 27 '12 at 15:18

1) You reassigned p, the array you were suppose to copy, by calling malloc().

2) You can't return the address of a local stack variable (a). Change a to a pointer, malloc it to the size of p, and copy p into. Malloc'd memory is heap memory, and so you can return such an address.

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a[] is a local automatic array. Once you return from the function, it is erased from memory, so the calling function can't use the array you returned.

What you probably wanted to do is to malloc a new array (ie, not p), into which you should assign the duplicates and return its values w/o freeing the malloced memory.

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Try to use better names, it might help in avoiding the obvious mix-up errors you have in your code.

For instance, start the function with:

student_record * answer4(const student_record *template, size_t n)
{
...
}

It also makes the code clearer. Note that I added const to make it clearer that the first argument is input-only, and made the type of the second one size_t which is good when dealing with "counts" and sizes of things.

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The code in this question is evolving quite quickly but at the time of this answer it contains these two lines:

free(q);
return q;

This is guaranteed to be wrong - after the call to free its argument points to invalid memory and anything could happen subsequently upon using the value of q. i.e. you're returning an invalid pointer. Since you're returning q, don't free it yet! It becomes a "caller-owned" variable and it becomes the caller's responsibility to free it.

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student_record* answer4(student_record* p, unsigned int n)
{
    uint8_t *data, *pos;
    size_t size = sizeof(student_record);
    data = malloc(size*n);

    pos = data;
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < n ; i++, pos=&pos[size])
        memcpy(pos,p,size);

    return (student_record *)data;
};

You may do like this.

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This compiles and, I think, does what you want:

student_record *answer4(const student_record *const p, const unsigned int n)
{
    unsigned int i;
    student_record *const a = malloc(sizeof(student_record)*n);
    for(i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        a[i] = p[i];
    }
    return a;
};

Several points:

  1. The existing array is identified as p. You want to copy from it. You probably do not want to free it (to free it is probably the caller's job).
  2. The new array is a. You want to copy to it. The function cannot free it, because the caller will need it. Therefore, the caller must take the responsibility to free it, once the caller has done with it.
  3. The array has n elements, indexed 0 through n-1. The usual way to express the upper bound on the index thus is i < n.
  4. The consts I have added are not required, but well-written code will probably include them.
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Altought, there are previous GOOD answers to this question, I couldn't avoid added my own. Since I got pascal programming in Collegue, I am used to do this, in C related programming languages:

void* AnyFunction(int AnyParameter)
{
   void* Result = NULL;

   DoSomethingWith(Result);

   return Result;
}

This, helps me to easy debug, and avoid bugs like the one mention by @ysap, related to pointers.

Something important to remember, is that the question mention to return a SINGLE pointer, this a common caveat, because a pointer, can be used to address a single item, or a consecutive array !!!

This question suggests to use an array as A CONCEPT, with pointers, NOT USING ARRAY SYNTAX.

// returns a single pointer to an array:
student_record* answer4(student_record* student, unsigned int n)
{
  // empty result variable for this function:
  student_record* Result = NULL;

  // the result will allocate a conceptual array, even if it is a single pointer:
  student_record* Result = malloc(sizeof(student_record)*n);

  // a copy of the destination result, will move for each item
  student_record* dest = Result;

  int i;
  for(i = 0; i < n ; i++){
    // copy contents, not address:
    *dest = *student;

    // move to next item of "Result"
    dest++;
  }

  // the data referenced by "Result", was changed using "dest"
  return Result;
} // student_record* answer4(...)

Check that, there is not subscript operator here, because of addressing with pointers.

Please, don't start a pascal v.s. c flame war, this is just a suggestion.

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