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This code in c++

void generate_moves(char _board[9], std::list<int> &move_list) {
    for(int i = 0; i < 9; ++i) {
        if(_board[i] == 0) {
            move_list.push_back(i);
        }
    }
}

I want to code like that but in java. How can I do it?

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1  
What have you tried? –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 27 '12 at 15:26
    
You cannot use pointers in java explicitly –  Rushil Apr 27 '12 at 15:27
    
seas.upenn.edu/~cis1xx/resources/JavaForCppProgrammers/… and many many more ... –  PeterMmm Apr 27 '12 at 15:28
1  
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The exact translation into Java is :

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        char[] board = new char[]
        {
            'o', 'o', 'o',
            'x', 'x', 'x',
            'x', 'x', 'x'
        };

        List<int> moves = new ArrayList<int>();
        generateMoves ( board, moves );
    }

    public static void generateMoves(char[] board, List<int> moves )
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < board.length; ++i)
        {
            if (board[i] == 0)
            {
                moves.add ( i );
            }
        }
    }
}

Because all objects are considered as passed by pointers in Java. There is no copy unless you specifically do it.

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thanks for answering.Why you set the char[]? –  Ersin Gülbahar Apr 27 '12 at 15:43
    
Actually, all objects are pass by value reference. Also, char[] board = new char[] { ... }; can be shortened to char[] board = { ... }. –  Ted Hopp Apr 27 '12 at 15:46
    
Why does the int become a String? –  Peter Lawrey Apr 27 '12 at 16:05
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void generate_moves(char _board[], List<Integer> move_list) {
    for (int i = 0; i < _board.length; ++i) {
        if (_board[i] == 0) {
            move_list.add(i);
        }
    }
}
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+1: I would use char[] board –  Peter Lawrey Apr 27 '12 at 15:36
    
@PeterLawrey - I probably would as well. Both styles work, of course, and C++ programmers might be more comfortable with the trailing []. I also don't know what meaning the underscore in the parameter name has to OP. –  Ted Hopp Apr 27 '12 at 15:40
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In this case, Java references will serve more-or-less as a c++ pointer.

public void generate_moves(..., List<Integer> move_list) {
 ...
  move_list.push_back(i);
}

In this case, the invoking push_back on the reference move_list is working exactly like your pointer example. The reference is followed to it's object instance, and then the method is invoked.

What you won't be able to do is access positions in array using pointer arithmetic. That is simply not possible in Java.

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Java references serve more or less as C++ references, not C++ pointers. –  Ted Hopp Apr 27 '12 at 15:31
    
thanks for answering. I want to learn move_list.pushback() does not defined. Why? –  Ersin Gülbahar Apr 27 '12 at 15:32
    
@tedd, based on the differences outlined here, I have to completely disagree. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reference_(C%2B%2B) –  hvgotcodes Apr 27 '12 at 15:33
    
@Ersin, you have to define that method. My code is not valid; just a guide –  hvgotcodes Apr 27 '12 at 15:33
    
move_list.push_back(i); means move_list.addLast(i); or move_list.add(i) –  Ersin Gülbahar Apr 27 '12 at 15:35
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