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In Python, how do I read a binary file and loop over each byte of that file?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 106 down vote accepted
f = open("myfile", "rb")
try:
    byte = f.read(1)
    while byte != "":
        # Do stuff with byte.
        byte = f.read(1)
finally:
    f.close()

By suggestion of chrispy:

with open("myfile", "rb") as f:
    byte = f.read(1)
    while byte != "":
        # Do stuff with byte.
        byte = f.read(1)

Note that the with statement is not available in versions of Python below 2.5. To use it in v 2.5 you'll need to import it:

from __future__ import with_statement

In 2.6 this is not needed.

In Python 3, it's a bit different. We will no longer get raw characters from the stream in byte mode but byte objects, thus we need to alter the condition:

with open("myfile", "rb") as f:
    byte = f.read(1)
    while byte != b"":
        # Do stuff with byte.
        byte = f.read(1)

Or as benhoyt says, skip the not equal and take advantage of the fact that b"" evaluates to false. This makes the code compatible between 2.6 and 3.x without any changes. It would also save you from changing the condition if you go from byte mode to text or the reverse.

with open("myfile", "rb") as f:
    byte = f.read(1)
    while byte:
        # Do stuff with byte.
        byte = f.read(1)
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4  
EOF? In Python? I think you meant "while len(byte) > 0:" or similar. –  RichieHindle Jun 23 '09 at 21:35
3  
The with statement would tidy up this code. –  chrispy Jun 23 '09 at 21:41
11  
Just a couple of nit-pickish Python style things: it's common (and PEP8 style) to use the fact that empty strings evaluate to false, so just "while byte: ..." would do. It's also common to use the "while True" idiom in Python so you don't have to repeat the f.read(1). Like "while True: byte = f.read(1); if not byte: break ...". –  Ben Hoyt Jun 23 '09 at 23:15
5  
@John Montgomery, "it'll quite when you read a zero": no it won't. You're reading characters, not integers, and no character value from '\x00' to '\xff' is ever False in Python. Only no character, as in '', will be False, and you'll get that only after exhausting your input. –  Peter Hansen Dec 18 '09 at 1:01
6  
Reading a file byte-wise is a performance nightmare. This cannot be the best solution available in python. This code should be used with care. –  usr Jul 6 '12 at 18:26

This generator yields bytes from a file, reading the file in chunks:

def bytes_from_file(filename, chunksize=8192):
    with open(filename, "rb") as f:
        while True:
            chunk = f.read(chunksize)
            if chunk:
                for b in chunk:
                    yield b
            else:
                break

# example:
for b in bytes_from_file('filename'):
    do_stuff_with(b)

See the Python documentation for information on iterators and generators.

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2  
+1. This is a useful solution if this is something you commonly do I guess. I would probably change it so that bytes_from_file took a file-like object though, so I could use it with all kinds of "streams". –  Skurmedel Jun 23 '09 at 21:53
1  
So you'll do open/close file for filesize/chunksize times? I'd suggest to pass filehandle to the generator. –  Sergey Romanovsky Mar 15 '13 at 4:07
6  
@SergeyRomanovsky It's a generator, so the second time an element is requested the code continues after the yield b, inside the with open(...) part, so the files stays open until the generator is exhausted –  Tobias Kienzler Aug 23 '13 at 8:25
1  
@codeape Just what I am looking for. But, how do you determine chunksize? Can it be an arbitrary value? –  swdev Aug 22 at 21:08
1  
@swdev: The example uses a chunksize of 8192 Bytes. The parameter for the file.read()-function simply specifies the size, i.e. the number of Bytes to be read. codeape chose 8192 Byte = 8 kB (actually it's KiB but that's not as commonly known). The value is "totally" random but 8 kB seems to be an appropriate value: not too much memory is wasted and still there are not "too many" read operations as in the accepted answer by Skurmedel... –  mozzbozz Oct 15 at 13:26

If the file is not too big that holding it in memory is a problem:

bytes_read = open("filename", "rb").read()
for b in bytes_read:
    process_byte(b)

where process_byte represents some operation you want to perform on the passed-in byte.

If you want to process a chunk at a time:

file = open("filename", "rb")
try:
    bytes_read = file.read(CHUNKSIZE)
    while bytes_read:
        for b in bytes_read:
            process_byte(b)
        bytes_read = file.read(CHUNKSIZE)
finally:
    file.close()
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To sum up all the brilliant points of chrispy, Skurmedel, Ben Hoyt and Peter Hansen, this would be the optimal solution for processing a binary file one byte at a time:

with open("myfile", "rb") as f:
    while True:
        byte = f.read(1)
        if not byte:
            break
        do_stuff_with(ord(byte))

For python versions 2.6 and above, because:

  • python buffers internally - no need to read chunks
  • DRY principle - do not repeat the read line
  • with statement ensures a clean file close
  • 'byte' evaluates to false when there are no more bytes (not when a byte is zero)

Or if you want it as a generator function like demonstrated by codeape:

def bytes_from_file(filename):
    with open(filename, "rb") as f:
        while True:
            byte = f.read(1)
            if not byte:
                break
            yield(ord(byte))

# example:
for b in bytes_from_file('filename'):
    do_stuff_with(b)
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1  
you could use iter(partial(file.read, 1), b'') instead of the while loop. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 16 '13 at 4:50

To read a file — one byte at a time, you could use two argument iter(callable, sentinel) built-in function:

from functools import partial

with open(filename, 'rb') as file:
    for byte in iter(partial(file.read, 1), b''):
        # Do stuff with byte

It calls file.read(1) until it returns nothing b'' (empty bytestring). It does not require additional memory for large files.

with-statement closes the file automatically — including the case when the code underneath raises an exception.

Despite the presence of internal buffering by default, it is still ineffective to process one byte at a time e.g., here's blackhole.py utility that eats everything it is given:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
"""Discard all input. `cat > /devnull` analog."""
import sys
from functools import partial
from collections import deque

bufsize = int(sys.argv[1]) if len(sys.argv) > 1 else (1 << 15)
deque(iter(partial(sys.stdin.detach().read, bufsize), b''), maxlen=0)

Example:

$ dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=1000 | python3 blackhole.py

It processes ~1.5GB/s with the default bufsize on my machine and only ~7.5MB/s if bufsize=1 i.e., it is 200 time slower to read one byte at a time. Take it into account if you can rewrite your processing to use more than one byte at a time and if you need performance.

mmap allows you to treat a file as a bytearray and a file object simultaneously. It can serve as an alternative to loading the whole file in memory if you need access to both interfaces. In particular, you can iterate one byte at a time over a memory-mapped file just using a plain for-loop:

from mmap import ACCESS_READ, mmap

with open(filename, 'rb') as f, mmap(f.fileno(), 0, access=ACCESS_READ) as mm:
    for byte in mm: # length is equal to the current file size
        # Do stuff with byte

mmap supports slice notation e.g., mm[i:i+len] returns len bytes from the file starting at position i. Context manager protocol is not supported before Python 3.2; you need to call mm.close() explicitly in this case. Iterating over each byte using mmap consumes more memory than file.read(1) but mmap is an order of magnitude faster.

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