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I have the below code to choose sin or cos to be integrated,

while( x !=1 || y !=(1||0) ){

      printf("Sin (1) or Cos (0)?\n");    
      x = scanf("%d",&y);
      _flushall();

      if(y==1){
        printf("Sin set\n");
      }
      else if(y==0){
        printf("Cos set\n");
      }
}

However the

    y!= (1||0)

never evaluates to true for y == 0 , can someone explain what's wrong here? Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are attempting to effectively code directly Boolean algebra, and C doesn't accept it in the manner you've provided.

while( x !=1 || y !=(1||0) )

should be

while( (x!=1) || ( (y!=1) || (y!=0) ) )

Never underestimate the value of using excess parentheses in C. The optimizer will likely optimize the code to be more efficient anyways.

The part of code that generates this error evaluates as follows: LHS (left hand side), RHS (right hand side)

LHS = y
!= (1||0) [definition given]
!= (1) [b/c (1||0) = (1)]

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You need (y != 1 && y != 0) (or similar, it depends on what you really mean to express there). The || operator is being applied to the operands 1 and 0. Put another way, y != (1 || 0) means "Do (1 || 0) then do y != result".

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y != (0||1)

is equivalent to

y != 1

since 0||1 is 1. You'll need two comparisons if you want y != 0 or y != 1.

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Is that necessarily true, or can you only guarantee that (0||1) isn't 0 (which would still give OP the same behavior)? –  Scott Hunter Apr 27 '12 at 15:33
    
See: stackoverflow.com/questions/7687403/… –  Mat Apr 27 '12 at 15:34
    
@ScottHunter: || and && will evaluate to 1 for true, 0 for false. –  John Bode Apr 27 '12 at 15:55

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