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On http://numbertext.org/linux/ it is written, that WikiPedia uses LinuxLibertine font-feature "ss05".

What does ss05 mean? Where is that font feature defined?

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1 Answer 1

The font-feature-settings property

This property provides low-level control over OpenType font features. It is intended as a way of providing access to font features that are not widely used but are needed for a particular use case. A value of ‘normal’ means that no change in glyph selection or positioning occurs due to this property.

/* enable small caps and use second swash alternate */
font-feature-settings: "smcp", "swsh" 2;

Feature tag values have the following syntax:

<feature-tag-value> = <string> [ <integer> | on | off ]?

The is a case-sensitive OpenType feature tag. As specified in the OpenType specification, feature tags contain four ASCII characters. Tag strings longer or shorter than four characters, or containing characters outside the U+20–7E codepoint range are invalid. User agents must not use a feature tag created by truncating or padding the string to four characters. Feature tags need only match a feature tag defined in the font, they are not limited to explicitly registered OpenType features. Fonts defining custom feature tags should follow the tag name rules defined in the OpenType specification [OPENTYPE-FEATURES]. Feature tags not present in the font are ignored; a user agent must not attempt to synthesize fallback behavior based on these feature tags.

If present, a value indicates an index used for glyph selection. An value must be 0 or greater. A value of 0 indicates that the feature is disabled. For boolean features, a value of 1 enables the feature. For non-boolean features, a value of 1 or greater enables the feature and indicates the feature selection index. A value of ‘on’ is synonymous with 1 and ‘off’ is synonymous with 0. If the value is omitted, a value of 1 is assumed.

Authors should generally use ‘font-variant’ and its related subproperties whenever possible and only use this property for special cases where its use is the only way of accessing a particular infrequently used font feature.

Although specifically defined for OpenType feature tags, feature tags for other modern font formats that support font features may be added in the future. Where possible, features defined for other font formats should attempt to follow the pattern of registered OpenType tags.

Examples

/* use small-cap alternate glyphs */
.smallcaps { -moz-font-feature-settings: "smcp=1"; }

/* convert both upper and lowercase to small caps (affects punctuation also) */
.allsmallcaps { -moz-font-feature-settings: "c2sc=1, smcp=1"; }

/* enable historical forms */
.hist { -moz-font-feature-settings: "hist=1"; }

/* disable common ligatures, usually on by default */
.noligs { -moz-font-feature-settings: "liga=0"; }

/* enable tabular (monospaced) figures */
td.tabular { -moz-font-feature-settings: "tnum=1"; }

/* enable automatic fractions */
.fractions { -moz-font-feature-settings: "frac=1"; }

/* use the second available swash character */
.swash { -moz-font-feature-settings: "swsh=2"; }

/* enable stylistic set 7 */
.fancystyle {
  font-family: Gabriola; /* available on Windows 7 */
  -moz-font-feature-settings: "ss07=1";
}

Source: http://dev.w3.org/csswg/css3-fonts/#propdef-font-feature-settings and https://developer.mozilla.org/en/CSS/-moz-font-feature-settings

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tl;dr, and I'm pretty sure the ss05 font feature isn't covered anywhere in this source. –  BoltClock Apr 27 '12 at 15:39
1  
@BoltClock'saUnicorn - Maybe if instead of posting useless comments like tl;dr and you read it, you'd realize that it was covered. –  j08691 Apr 27 '12 at 15:41

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