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I have a tab-delimited file, for example

ID   NAME      FAMILYTAG     EFFECT
001  John      Black         Positive
002  Kate      Rhodes,Mich   Positive
003  Aaron     Sunders       Negative
004  Shirley   Rhodes        Negative
005  Dexter    Sunders,Hark  Positive

I want to input this file (which is actually much larger) and read in a name, for example Kate. The I want the script to recognize its family tag i.e. it contains Rhodes, and then output the other family member Shirley. Is there a way to do this? The output file will look like this.

Kate  Rhodes 
Shirley Rhodes
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3  
Your question should include how to handle the mulltiple comma-separated values in the third column. Also, your version of the question on PerlMonks (by the way it is bad manners to ask the same question in multiple forums at once) has a space in Rhodes, Mich. You must explain your problem accurately and precisely or the answers you get won't solve the real problem. –  Borodin Apr 27 '12 at 22:48

4 Answers 4

Here's one way to get the output you want, given your input...

use warnings;
use strict;

my %names;
while (<DATA>) {
    next if /^ID/;
    my ($first, $last) = (split)[1 .. 2];
    $last =~ s/,//;
    push @{ $names{$last} }, $first;
}
print "$_ Rhodes\n" for @{ $names{Rhodes} };

__DATA__
ID     NAME   FAMILYTAG   EFFECT
001  John      Black               Positive
002  Kate      Rhodes, Mich           Positive
003  Aaron   Sunders          Negative
004  Shirley  Rhodes          Negative
005  Dexter    Sunders        Positive

Copied from my Answer on PerlMonks

share|improve this answer
    
Hi toolic, I saw that..Have asked a question too:) What I want to know is this just matching for all entries with Rhodes? The script should read in Kate but I am not sure if that is what it is doing? –  Lumos Lumos Apr 27 '12 at 16:13
    
@toolic: you clearly have insider knowledge that the data actually has a space after the commas! –  Borodin Apr 27 '12 at 22:44

I'm not clear what the multiple names in the FAMILYTAG column indicate but I have put this together assuming they're alternative surnames.

use strict;
use warnings;

my %names;
my %families;

while (<DATA>) {
  next unless /^\d/;
  my ($id, $name, $familytag, $effect) = split /\t/;
  for my $tag (split /,/, $familytag) {
    push @{ $names{$name} }, $tag;
    push @{ $families{$tag} }, $name;
  }
}

while () {

  print "\nName: ";
  chomp (my $name = <>);
  last unless $name =~ /\S/;
  print "\n";

  if (my $tags = $names{$name}) {
    for my $tag (@$tags) {
      my $names = $families{$tag};
      next unless @$names > 1;
      printf "%s %s\n", $_, $tag for @$names;
    }
  }
  else {
    warn qq(No name "$name" found);
  }
}


__DATA__
ID  NAME    FAMILYTAG   EFFECT
001 John    Black   Positive
002 Kate    Rhodes,Mich Positive
003 Aaron   Sunders Negative
004 Shirley Rhodes  Negative
005 Dexter  Sunders,Hark    Positive

output

E:\Perl\source>ff.pl

Name: Kate

Kate Rhodes
Shirley Rhodes

Name: Aaron

Aaron Sunders
Dexter Sunders

Name: Mike

No name "Mike" found at E:\Perl\source\ff.pl line 31, <> line 3.

Name: Dexter

Aaron Sunders
Dexter Sunders
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Astute use of while () in regards to a recent question. :) –  TLP Apr 28 '12 at 5:58
    
@TLP: I dither between writing while () { ... }, while (1) { ... } and { ... redo; } when I need an indefinite loop. –  Borodin Apr 28 '12 at 9:21
#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
my %db;

open (F,'1.pl.tst');

my $find="Kate";
while(<F>)
{
    chomp;
    if (/^(\d+)[\t\ ]+(\w+)[\t\ ]+([^\t\ ]+)[\t\ ]+(\w+)$/)
    {
        $db{$1}{'name'}=$2;
        $db{$1}{'family'}=[split(',',$3)];
        $db{$1}{'effect'}=$4;
    }
}

my @family=@{name2family($find)};
foreach (@family)
{
    family2name($_);
}

sub name2family
{
    my $name=shift;
    foreach (keys %db)
    {
        if ($db{$_}{'name'} eq $name)
        {
            return $db{$_}{'family'};
        }
    }
}

sub family2name
{
    my $family=shift;
    foreach my $k (keys %db)
    {
        foreach (@{$db{$k}{'family'}})
        {
            if ($_ eq $family)
            {
                print $db{$k}{'name'}."\t\t".$_."\n";
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Some pointers: You should always use use warnings, and check the return value of an open call. splits first argument is a regex, /,/, not a string ','. You do not need to escape space inside a character class bracket [\t ]. chomp is redundant since $ in your regex includes possible trailing newlines. Using a hash %db the way you do it is equivalent to using an array. –  TLP Apr 27 '12 at 17:32
    
use warning gives me the error, Can't use string as an ARRAY ref while "strict refs" in use. The script runs okay keeping TLP's pointers in mind..but I do not get any output. I tried outputting it to a txt file but it remains blank. –  Lumos Lumos Apr 27 '12 at 17:44
    
The primary reason for using a tab-delimited file is so that the fields themselves can contain spaces. Instead of [\t\ ] your regex should use simply \t. Even better, just use split /\t/. –  Borodin Apr 27 '12 at 22:32
    
@TLP i don't have warnings on '-w' or 'use warnings. and have correct answer Kate Rhodes Shirley Rhodes Kate Mich –  askovpen Apr 28 '12 at 5:12
    
I know, that's why I said you should always use warnings. I was commenting on your code only. –  TLP Apr 28 '12 at 5:56

Text::CSV can be told to use a different separator character; "\t" in this case.

use Text::CSV;

my $tsv = Text::CSV->new ( { sep_char => "\t" } );

Then use the $tsv object similarly to the $csv object in the examples for that module.

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