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I'm writing a simple HashMap-based Cache that works as follows:

  1. If the requested key is in cache, return its value.
  2. If the requested key is not there, run a method that produces value based on key, store both, return value.

The code:

import java.util.HashMap;

abstract class Cache<K, V> extends HashMap<K, V> {  
    @Override
    public V get(Object key) {
        if (containsKey(key)) {
            return super.get(key);
        } else {
            V val = getData(key);
            put((K)key, val);    // this is the line I'm discussing below
            return val;
        }
    }

    public abstract V getData(Object key);
}

It's pretty straightforward and works well. However, I hate the Sun's decision for get() to take an Object as its argument and not K. I've read enough about it to know that it has some rationale behind it (with which I don't agree, but that's another story).

My problem is in the commented line, because it seems that the cast has to be unchecked. Due to type erasure, there's no way I can check whether key is of type K (which is needed for proper put() functionality) and the method is, therefore, error prone.

One solution would be to switch from "is a" to "has a" HashMap relationship which is much nicer and clean, but then Cache can't implement Map which would be nice for several reasons. The code:

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

abstract class Cache<K, V> {
    private final Map<K, V> map = new HashMap<K, V>();

    public V get(K key) {
        if (map.containsKey(key)) {
            return map.get(key);
        } else {
            V val = getData(key);
            map.put(key, val);
            return val;
        }
    }

    public abstract V getData(K key);
}

Can anyone come up with any other (even hackish) solution, so that I could maintain Cache to be a Map and still be type safe in the terms of get(Object key) and put(K key, V val)?

The only thing I can think of is to make another method named i.e. getValue(Key k) that would delegate to get(Object key), but then I can't force anyone to use the new method instead of the usual one.

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1  
You can implement getA or myget You can't change the behaviour of Map.get() as you can can't force code which uses the interface instead of your class directly to be recompiled. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 27 '12 at 16:14
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Nope. You've found the right solution in switching to a "has-a" relationship. (Frankly, having the get method compute a new value if one doesn't already exist is surprising, violates the Map contract, and can lead to extremely weird behavior for a number of other methods. This was a big part of why Guava moved away from MapMaker, which offered almost this exact behavior -- because it was just so riddled with issues.)

That said, what e.g. Guava's Cache does is it exposes a Map<K, V> asMap() view, which is a thing you could do. That gives you most of the advantages of a Map without compromising on type safety.

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It seems the MapMaker indeed did what I do :). I am partially aware of the weird behaviour. The method V getData(K key) is abstract and therefore is intended to be only specified (implemented) on Cache instantiation. I even tried to make the class final abstract (even though I knew 100% that it won't work) or just final (with the method overridable by anonymous inner class - doesn't, of course, work either) to ensure nobody will try to subclass this dangerous piece of code with some business logic. Anyway, thanks a lot, the "has-a" relationship with asMap() giving a view it is. –  Slanec Apr 27 '12 at 16:38
    
By the way, I can't believe I missed the Guava's Cache. I won't use it now (when I have my own implementation) out of pride, but if I knew that yesterday... :) –  Slanec Apr 27 '12 at 16:55
5  
You...should consider using Guava's Cache anyway. It's used in Google production, so it's been heavily tested and optimized, and it's got lots of handy features. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 27 '12 at 16:59
    
Is it really okay to switch to "HAS-A" relationship (for other Java program generally) ? –  Keenan Gebze Aug 10 '13 at 9:08
    
@KeenanGebze Has-a (composition) is mostly preferred, yes. Is-a (inheritance) is usually used wrongly, anyway (as was this case here), so it should be only used when really needed and when you're sure it's architecturally justified. –  Slanec Jan 3 at 11:38
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definitly the has-a relationship is a correct implementation. the business logic of how the value is generated should be removed out of the cache class.

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That's the fun part about it - there's no logic! The method is abstract and therefore should be only specified (implemented, overriden - whichever you like most) on Cache instantiation. I even tried to make the class final abstract (even though I knew 100% that it won't work) or just final (with the method overridable by anonymous inner class - doesn't, of course, work either) to ensure nobody will try to subclass this dangerous piece of code with some business logic. –  Slanec Apr 27 '12 at 16:36
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