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I am able to create a flat serialized JSON string pretty easily with c#

My issue is I want to create a nested string like this below

[ { 
    title: "Yes",
    id : "1",
    menu: [ { 
        title: "Maybe",
        id : "3",
        alert : "No",
        menu: [ {
            title: "Maybe Not",
            id : "8",
            alert : "No",
            menu: []
        } ]
    } ]
},
{
    title: "No",
    id : "2",
    menu: []
}]

Any help would be great

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1  
Are you using JSON.Net library or a custom implementation? Check if the library can help - will save you a ton of time... –  Sunny Apr 27 '12 at 16:11
    
What are you defining as a nested string ? –  Erik Philips Apr 27 '12 at 16:13
1  
@cWilk, You should post your code (expecting 1 or 2 lines) that shows what particular "pretty easily" way of creating JSON you pick. –  Alexei Levenkov Apr 27 '12 at 16:16
    
return data from SP - created object listItem[] li = new listItem[count] - returnString = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(li); return returnString –  cWilk Apr 27 '12 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

are you using MVC 3? - doing something like:

return Json(myObectWithListProperties, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

I use this to return complex c# objects that match the structure of the javascript objects i want.

e.g.:

        var bob = new {
            name = "test"
            ,orders = new[] {
                new  { itemNo = 1, description = "desc"}
                ,new  { itemNo = 2, description = "desc2"}
            }
        };

        return Json(bob, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

gives:

{
   "name":"test",
   "orders":[
      {
         "itemNo":1,
         "description":"desc"
      },
      {
         "itemNo":2,
         "description":"desc2"
      }
   ]
}

EDIT: a bit more nesting for fun:

        var bob = new {
            name = "test"
            ,
            orders = new [] {
                new  { itemNo = 1, description = "desc"}
                ,new  { itemNo = 2, description = "desc2"}

            }
            ,test = new  {
                    a = new {
                        b = new {
                            something = "testing"
                            ,someOtherThing = new {
                                aProperty="1"
                                ,another="2"
                                ,theThird=new{
                                    bob="quiteDeepNesting"
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
        };

        return Json(bob, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

Gives:

{
   "name":"test",
   "orders":[
      {
         "itemNo":1,
         "description":"desc"
      },
      {
         "itemNo":2,
         "description":"desc2"
      }
   ],
   "test":{
      "a":{
         "b":{
            "something":"testing",
            "someOtherThing":{
               "aProperty":"1",
               "another":"2",
               "theThird":{
                  "bob":"quiteDeepNesting"
               }
            }
         }
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if this is quite what i'm after, I dont know how many nested levels there will be when make the call to the DB, Multiple objects , wtith potentially multiple objects –  cWilk Apr 27 '12 at 16:29
    
not checked the limits (if there are any but just opened an app where shipments have collections of items that have statuses with are all complex objects. seems to run fine –  gordatron Apr 27 '12 at 16:32
    
well that works.. give it a go, if your using MVC 3 hopefully it will be a quick test –  gordatron Apr 27 '12 at 16:41
    
I should probably give a bit more info , I query the DB bringing back say a list of 10 items , each have unique ID's and a parent keys, I want to build my object and then serialize into JSON, I beleive the building of the object and assigning the correct kids to correct parents is where my issue lies –  cWilk Apr 30 '12 at 7:16
    
I guess my question really is , how do you create the complex c# objects in the first place ? –  cWilk Apr 30 '12 at 8:21

Try using

using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

//Assumed code to connect to a DB and get data out using a Reader goes here

Object data = new {
    a = reader.GetString(field1),
    b = reader.GetString(field2),
    c = reader.GetString(field3)
};
JavaScriptSerializer javaScriptSerializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
string json = javaScriptSerializer.Serialize(data);

This is built-in and saves you the work of serializing to JSON yourself!

This example assumes you are getting data from a database using some sort of reader, and it then constructs the object you want to serialize using an anonymous class. Your anonymous class can be as simple or complex as you need it to be and the JavaScriptSerializer will handle transforming it to JSON. This approach is also useful because you can easily control the JSON property names it will create in the JSON.

share|improve this answer
    
I should probably give a bit more info , I query the DB bringing back say a list of 10 items , each have unique ID's and a parent keys, I want to build my object and then serialize into JSON, I beleive the building of the object and assigning the correct kids to correct parents is where my issue lies –  cWilk Apr 30 '12 at 7:17
    
No problem--I've done the same myself in an app I worked on. I took the result from the DB and used it to create an anonymous class which I then passed to the serialization method. So for the "data" object above, you might construct it like this: new {a = reader.GetString(field1), b = reader.GetString(field2), c = reader.GetString(field3) }; Using an anonymous class declaration for the object you pass to the JavaScriptSerializer's Serialize method gives you easy control over what to include in the JSON and how it will be represented, without needing to create a named class. –  Shawn Apr 30 '12 at 16:53

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