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Following program will connect to the web and get html content of “msnbc.com” webpage and print out the result. If it takes longer than 2 seconds to get data from the webpage, I want my method to stop working and return. Can you please tell me how can I do this with an example?

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        gethtml();
        MessageBox.Show("End of program");
    }

    public void gethtml()
    {
        HttpWebRequest WebRequestObject = (HttpWebRequest)HttpWebRequest.Create("http://msnbc.com/");

        WebResponse Response = WebRequestObject.GetResponse();
        Stream WebStream = Response.GetResponseStream();

        StreamReader Reader = new StreamReader(WebStream);
        string webcontent = Reader.ReadToEnd();
        MessageBox.Show(webcontent);
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
You probably want to execute the fetch in a thread, and abort the thread if it takes more than two seconds (via a timer setup/invoke). – ashes999 Apr 27 '12 at 16:20
6  
@ashes999: That is a very, very bad idea. Only abort a thread if you are planning on taking down the entire process. Aborting a thread should be a last resort. Aborting a managed thread can corrupt data structures arbitrarily. – Eric Lippert Apr 27 '12 at 16:28
    
Thanks a lot for all of your answers. – Learner_51 Apr 27 '12 at 16:39
    
@EricLippert the way we do it in Silverlight is to create a cancellable BackgroundWorker, which is abortable. Maybe I should have been more precise :) – ashes999 Apr 27 '12 at 16:46
4  
@ashes999: Being safely abortable is not a property of a thread; it is a property of what the thread is doing. Does the thread mutate a shared data structure and leave it in an invalid state when the thread is aborted? is the relevant question. – Eric Lippert Apr 27 '12 at 17:17
up vote 4 down vote accepted

As stated above .Timeout

    public void gethtml()
    {
        HttpWebRequest WebRequestObject = (HttpWebRequest)HttpWebRequest.Create("http://msnbc.com/");
        WebRequestObject.Timeout = (System.Int32)TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2).TotalMilliseconds;
        try
        {
            WebResponse Response = WebRequestObject.GetResponse();
            Stream WebStream = Response.GetResponseStream();

            StreamReader Reader = new StreamReader(WebStream);
            string webcontent = Reader.ReadToEnd();
            MessageBox.Show(webcontent);
        }
        catch (System.Net.WebException E)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Fail");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for showing me with an example. – Learner_51 Apr 27 '12 at 16:38

Two seconds is far too long to block the UI. You should only block the UI if you are planning on getting the result in, say fifty milliseconds or less.

Read this article on how to do a web request without blocking the UI:

http://www.developerfusion.com/code/4654/asynchronous-httpwebrequest/

Note that this will all be much easier in C# 5, which is in beta release at present. In C# 5 you can simply use the await operator to asynchronously await the result of the task. If you would like to see how this sort of thing will work in C# 5, see:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/async

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Set the Timeout property of your WebRequest object. Documentation

MSDN Example:

// Create a new WebRequest Object to the mentioned URL.
WebRequest myWebRequest=WebRequest.Create("http://www.contoso.com");
Console.WriteLine("\nThe Timeout time of the request before setting is : {0} milliseconds",myWebRequest.Timeout);

// Set the 'Timeout' property in Milliseconds.
myWebRequest.Timeout=10000;

// This request will throw a WebException if it reaches the timeout limit before it is able to fetch the resource.
WebResponse myWebResponse=myWebRequest.GetResponse();
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Don't forget to handle timeout exception when use it. – Alexei Levenkov Apr 27 '12 at 16:24

You can use the TimeOut property on HttpWebRequest

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Consider switching to asynchronous downloading of the content. You will stop blocking UI thread and will be able to handle multiple requests easily. You will be able to increase timeout significantly without impact on UI, and can decide upon receiving response if you still want to fetch data.

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