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Is there a way to specify maximum execution time of an ajax post to the server so if the server doesn't respond, then keep trying for 10 seconds and then continue with the rest of the code??

Function doajaxPost(){
      var returned_value="";

        //#############I NEED THIS CODE TO TRY TO POST THE DATA TO THE SERVER AND KEEP 
        //#############TRYING FOR 10 SECONDS AND THEN CONTINUE WITH THE REST OF THE CODE. 
                    jQuery.ajax({
                           url: 'ajaxhandler.php',
                           success: function (result) {                               
                                        returned_value=result;
                           },
                           async: false
                        });
        //###################################################

        alert(returned_value);
    some other code
    .
    .
    .

 }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Use timeout

jQuery.ajax({
               url: 'ajaxhandler.php',
               success: function (result) {                               
                            returned_value=result;
               },
               timeout: 10000,
               async: false
            });

However, alert(returned_value); will execute just after your call (won't wait for the call to finish)

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Be aware this won't retry. It will only try once. –  Alexander Apr 27 '12 at 17:17

The JQuery API documentation tells how to set a "timeout".

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/

While other answers here are correct, learning to check the documentation for yourself is more valuable than knowing just this answer.

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You can set timeout value for your ajax request.

timeout

Set a timeout (in milliseconds) for the request. This will override any global timeout set with $.ajaxSetup(). The timeout period starts at the point the $.ajax call is made; if several other requests are in progress and the browser has no connections available, it is possible for a request to time out before it can be sent. In jQuery 1.4.x and below, the XMLHttpRequest object will be in an invalid state if the request times out; accessing any object members may throw an exception. In Firefox 3.0+ only, script and JSONP requests cannot be cancelled by a timeout; the script will run even if it arrives after the timeout period.

Here is an example:

$.ajax({
   url: "ajaxhandler.php",
   ...
   timeout: 10000,
   ... 
});
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how is this possible can you please demonstrate it? –  themis Apr 27 '12 at 16:49

Set a timeout (in milliseconds) for the request. This will override any global timeout set with $.ajaxSetup(). The timeout period starts at the point the $.ajax call is made; if several other requests are in progress and the browser has no connections available, it is possible for a request to time out before it can be sent. In jQuery 1.4.x and below, the XMLHttpRequest object will be in an invalid state if the request times out; accessing any object members may throw an exception. In Firefox 3.0+ only, script and JSONP requests cannot be cancelled by a timeout; the script will run even if it arrives after the timeout period.

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