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I have this functional Linq-to-Sql statement.

public IEnumerable<int> GetChildIds(IEnumerable<int> selectedParentIds)
{
    using (var context = new MyContext())
    {
        return context.Children
            .Where(c => selectedParentIds.Contains(c.parentId))
            .Select(c => c.Id)
            .ToList();
    }
}

It gives me the selected child Id's, as requested but, I've been running SQL Profiler.

This statement appears to send a seperate request to the database for each selectedParentId which seems sub-optimal to me.

Is there a way I can restructure this statement to minimise the traffic with the server? Is there a different approach I should take or, is this just as good as it gets?

EDIT

Thanks for the guidance.

This is a mistake on my interpretation of my trace ouput, Linq-To-SQL make a perfectly reasonable statement for SQLServer 2005 just as it does for SQLServer 2008. The problem is elsewhere.

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Is there anything odd about selectedParentIds? What happens if you do a ToList() on it? e.g. .Where(c => selectedParentIds.ToList().Contains(c.parentId)). –  Phil Apr 27 '12 at 17:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The same query using LINQ to SQL against SQL 2008 produces a single SQL query. Are you able to test against SQL Server 2008?

For example:

IEnumerable<int> list = new List<int>{1,2,3};

Models.Where (m => list.Contains(m.Id)).Select (m => m.Id).ToList();

Produces

-- Region Parameters
DECLARE @p0 Int = 1
DECLARE @p1 Int = 2
DECLARE @p2 Int = 3
-- EndRegion
SELECT [t0].[Id]
FROM [Models] AS [t0]
WHERE [t0].[Id] IN (@p0, @p1, @p2)

And the same thing using Entity Framework produces

SELECT 
[Extent1].[Id] AS [Id]
FROM [dbo].[Models] AS [Extent1]
WHERE [Extent1].[Id] IN (1,2,3)

So without being able to check this against SQL 2005, I'm going to risk it and say, no there's nothing you can do unless you upgrade the server.

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Yes, but I doubt the customer is ready to upgrade. I guess for SQL Server 2008 the framework uses a "table value parameter" msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb675163.aspx –  Jodrell Apr 27 '12 at 16:53
3  
I don't think linq to sql produces different results depending on the version of the server you are using. If you replace ".ToList()" with ".ToString()", you can see the generated query in the debugger. –  RobSiklos Apr 27 '12 at 17:05
    
Interesting, both the produced statements are perfectly valid TSQL in 2005. –  Jodrell Apr 27 '12 at 17:05
    
@RobSiklos thanks for the tip. –  Jodrell Apr 27 '12 at 17:13

Does this produce anything different?

public IEnumerable<int> GetChildIds(IEnumerable<int> selectedParentIds)
{
using (var context = new MyContext())
{
    return context.Children
        .Where(c => selectedParentIds.Any( p => p == c.parentId ))
        .Select(c => c.Id)
        .ToList();
}
}
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I get a System.NotSupportedException at runtime with the message "Local sequence cannot be used in LINQ to SQL implementations of query operator except the Contains operator." Does it work with a SQL2008+ server? –  Jodrell Apr 27 '12 at 17:01
    
Also, intersting that its legal to refer to the nesting closure, in side the nested closure like that. Appears to be valid Linq so I'll remember that. –  Jodrell Apr 27 '12 at 17:03
    
That query doesn't work using Linq to SQL against SQL 2008, but does using Entity Framework. It's a much more complicated and less efficient query though. –  Phil Apr 27 '12 at 17:04
    
Yeah, it was just an idea. –  SouthShoreAK Apr 27 '12 at 17:05

If you're getting different output for different versions of SQL Server you could always try something like this

public IEnumerable<int> GetChildIds(IEnumerable<int> selectedParentIds)
{
    using (var context = new MyContext())
    {
        var query = context.Children;
        foreach (var id in selectedParentIds)
        {
            query = query.Where(q => q.parentId == id);
        }

        return query.Select(q => q.Id)
                    .ToList();
    }
}

I no longer have an instance of SQL Server 2005 to test this on (SQL Server 2008 R2 using compatibility mode still produces a single query, even for your initial code), but this should produce a single query with multiple where clauses no matter what version of SQL Server you're on.

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