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Consider the following:

ComplexObject foo()
{
    ComplexObject temp;
    //Do things with temp
    ComplexObject result(temp, SOME_OTHER_SETTING); //1
    //Do things with result. Do not use temp at all
    return result; //2
}

ComplexObject foo()
{
    ComplexObject temp;
    //Do things with temp
    ComplexObject result(std::move(temp), SOME_OTHER_SETTING); //1
    //Do things with result. Do not use temp at all
    return std::move(result); //2
}

with the assumption that ComplexObject has a move constructor which is far more efficient than it's copy constructor.

Is the compiler allowed to effectively transform the first code into the second code, because it knows that ComplexObject cannot be used for the remainder of that block?

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Also, does ComplexObject have a non-trivial destructor? –  Ben Voigt Apr 27 '12 at 16:57
    
@BenVoigt: Let's say it contains something like a vector, yes. –  Billy ONeal Apr 27 '12 at 17:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not for temp, but the compiler can perform other optimizations under the as-if rule, which may have the same effect.

For result, there is a special rule regarding return statements, that will use a move if possible (and elision is preferred over either move or copy).

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The as-if rule won't have that effect. If the compiler can't inline the constructors, it can't prove they don't have different observable side-effect and if it can, inlining the copy constructor and eliminating all instructions it can using as-if rule is likely to be as efficient and already implemented. –  Jan Hudec Jul 23 '12 at 12:09
    
@JanHudec: That's what I said in my answer. –  Ben Voigt Jul 23 '12 at 14:40
    
That sentence is a bit misleading; the "same effect" lacks context. –  Jan Hudec Jul 24 '12 at 7:04

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