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So I've been trying to get a handle on Big Oh calculations. I feel I have the basics down but am stumped on what seems a really easy calculation. So if the calculation below has a big oh of O(n log n) (I really hope I've at least got that right) what does changing the order of the loops do to the complexity? Thanks so much in advance for your time.

    int ONLogN(int N) //O(n log n)
    {
        int iIterations = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
        {
            ++iIterations;
            for (int j = 1; j < N + 1; j *= 2)
                ++iIterations;
        }
        return iIterations;
    }
    int WhatBigOhIsThis(int N) //???
    {
        int iIterations = 0;
        for (int j = 1; j < N + 1; j *= 2)
        {
            ++iIterations;
            for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)                
                ++iIterations;
        }
        return iIterations;
    }
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4  
What do you think it is? Outer loop is O(log N), inner loop is O(N) so I leave you to guess the combined result. –  Basile Starynkevitch Apr 27 '12 at 16:50
    
It's almost as easy as "If a*b=x, what's b*a?" question :) –  dasblinkenlight Apr 27 '12 at 16:51
    
I would've thought O(n log n) as well but I doubt myself as I haven't done anything with big oh before this week. –  user1361473 Apr 27 '12 at 16:56
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The index variables on the two loops are independent, hence the resulting complexity is necessarily the same.

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Thank you very much. I appreciate the simple confirmation. –  user1361473 Apr 27 '12 at 17:05
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You're still looping for the same number of iterations. Changing the order of the loops would have no effect on complexity

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They may have the same complexity but for an input of say 32 the first function produced 224 iterations while the second 198. –  user1361473 Apr 27 '12 at 17:09
    
Big-Oh notation does not concern itself with actual numbers, though. For example, you could have two different constant offsets and the complexity would still be n log(n). Actually, that is the point of the notation itself. –  Luca Geretti Apr 27 '12 at 17:13
    
I'm begining to appreciate that. Thanks again! –  user1361473 Apr 27 '12 at 17:14
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