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people know that we can use if statement to configure a query in the select statement like this

select if(var=1,amount,amount/2) from mytable;

But what if I want to achieve something like this:

select amount from if(var=1,mytable1,mytable2);

Is there any way to configure the table at run time?

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2  
Where does var come from? If it's a variable in another language, you could test it in that other language and then construct different SQL as appropriate. If it's a user variable in SQL, you could similarly use an IF statement around the two alternative SELECT statements. –  eggyal Apr 27 '12 at 17:21
    
It is from another language which will call this sql file and pass in the variable and I want to keep only one sql file. –  Peiti Peter Li Apr 27 '12 at 17:27
    
I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "I want to keep only one sql file". See the first option under my answer below. –  eggyal Apr 27 '12 at 17:32
    
oh what I mean is: I can write two sql files using different tables and modify my caller to call different table depending on the variable var. But I am not gonna do that. I just want to use only one sql file and pass the var into the sql file and the sql file can distinguish the variable which was passed in by the caller and then use the appropriate table accordingly. –  Peiti Peter Li Apr 27 '12 at 17:34
    
But why do you want to do it that way? If you absolutely must, you can use the SQL IF statement shown in the second option in my answer with your externally passed-in variable. But that is, IMHO, utterly bizarre. –  eggyal Apr 27 '12 at 17:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT amount FROM mytable1 WHERE @var = 1
UNION
SELECT amount FROM mytable2 WHERE @var = 0

UPD: Here's what MySQL EXPLAIN looks like for the part of the query which has a condition evaluating to FALSE:

Note the Impossible WHERE part. MySQL recognizes that the expression in WHERE is constantly evaluating to FALSE, so it doesn't even try executing the query. Hence, no performance overhead when using this approach.

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you were right about my anwser, so I removed it. But I think the exact solution can't be found without the exact problem. –  dystroy Apr 27 '12 at 17:23
    
Hi Shedal, I have question for your solution, if @var is 1 will the second query under UNION execute by fetching same amount of data as normal? I am considering the efficiency issue. –  Peiti Peter Li Apr 27 '12 at 18:23
1  
@PeitiPeterLi Obviously, in case @var = 1, the second query will not fetch anything, because for each row, the condition is not met. In fact, MySQL will optimize it and skip the whole query, since it has a constant FALSE condition. I just checked it, also in a UNION, (MySQL 5.0.90) and it does not hurt performance at all. –  Shedal Apr 27 '12 at 18:53
    
Updated my answer. –  Shedal Apr 27 '12 at 18:59

(Upgrading to an answer)

Where did var come from?

  1. If it's a variable in another language, you could test it in that other language and then construct different SQL as appropriate:

    $sql = "SELECT amount FROM " . ($var = 1 ? "mytable1" : "mytable2");
    
  2. If it's a user variable in SQL, you could similarly use an IF statement around the two alternative SELECT statements:

    DELIMITER ;;
    
    IF @var = 1 THEN
      SELECT amount FROM mytable1;
    ELSE
      SELECT amount FROM mytable2;
    END IF;;
    
    DELIMITER ;
    
  3. If it's anything else (like a field from your tables), then your question doesn't make a great deal of sense.

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Based on the mysql manual pages, it appears you cannot do this with the traditional syntax.

"User variables are intended to provide data values. They cannot be used directly in an SQL statement as an identifier or as part of an identifier, such as in contexts where a table or database name is expected, or as a reserved word such as SELECT." - [http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/user-variables.html][1]

The exception to this is that you can assemble a prepared statement, but is probably not a better solution for most programming tasks. It would be better to leave the sql string generation to the language invoking mysql.

But, if you are doing this as part of a "sql only" task, like an import, this seems to be the approach you must take.

SET @s = CONCAT("SELECT * FROM ", if(true, "table1", "table2"), " LIMIT 1");
PREPARE stmt FROM @s;
EXECUTE stmt;
DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt;

SET @s = CONCAT("SELECT * FROM ", if(false, "table1", "table2"), " LIMIT 1");
PREPARE stmt FROM @s;
EXECUTE stmt;
DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt;
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