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In other .NET languages such as C# you can switch on a string value:

string val = GetVal();
switch(val)
{
case "val1":
  DoSomething();
  break;
case "val2":
default:
  DoSomethingElse();
  break;
}

This doesn't seem to be the case in C++/CLI

System::String ^val = GetVal();
switch(val)  // Compile error
{
   // Snip
}

Is there a special keyword or another way to make this work for C++/CLI as it does in C#?

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I also believe this is true for Java, i.e., no switching on strings. –  Ed S. Jun 23 '09 at 22:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Actually, you can use anything other than integers (sometimes designated by integral types) if the tested objects defines conversion to integer.

String object do not.

However, you could create a map with string keys (check that the comparison is well processed) and pointers to classes implementing some interface as values:

class MyInterface {
  public:
    virtual void doit() = 0;
}

class FirstBehavior : public MyInterface {
  public:
    virtual void doit() {
      // do something
    }
}

class SecondBehavior : public MyInterface {
  public:
    virtual void doit() {
      // do something else
    }
}

...
map<string,MyInterface*> stringSwitch;
stringSwitch["val1"] = new FirstBehavior();
stringSwitch["val2"] = new SecondBehavior();
...

// you will have to check that your string is a valid one first...
stringSwitch[val]->doit();

A bit long to implement, but well designed.

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This is a really nice solution, thanks. –  Downward Facing God Nov 11 '10 at 16:04

I know my answer comes a little bit too late, but I think this is a good solution as well.

struct ltstr {
    bool operator()(const char* s1, const char* s2) const {
    	return strcmp(s1, s2) < 0;
    }
};

std::map<const char*, int, ltstr> msgMap;

enum MSG_NAMES{
 MSG_ONE,
 MSG_TWO,
 MSG_THREE,
 MSG_FOUR
};

void init(){
msgMap["MSG_ONE"] = MSG_ONE;
msgMap["MSG_TWO"] = MSG_TWO;
}

void processMsg(const char* msg){
 std::map<const char*, int, ltstr>::iterator it = msgMap.find(msg);
 if (it == msgMap.end())
  return; //Or whatever... using find avoids that this message is allocated in the map even if not present...

 switch((*it).second){
  case MSG_ONE:
   ...
  break:

  case MSG_TWO:
  ...
  break;

 }
}
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I think I found a solution on codeguru.com.

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You certainly can't use anything other than an integer in a switch statement in C / C++. The easiest way to do this in C++ is to use and if ... else statement:

std::string val = getString();
if (val.equals("val1") == 0)
{
  DoSomething();
}
else if (val.equals("val2") == 0)
{
  DoSomethingElse();
}

Edit:

I just spotted you asked about C++/CLI - I don't know if the above still applies; it certainly does in ANSI C++.

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switching on strings in c# is partly just syntactical sugar. when switching on an int the compiler uses a jump table with the value of the int used as the key, when switching on a string the resulting binary ressembles if-if-else-else (tho not by no means identical) –  Rune FS Jun 24 '09 at 5:51
    
Actually, when switching on a string the C# compiler also makes a jump table. See stackoverflow.com/questions/395618/if-else-vs-switch –  heavyd Jun 24 '09 at 12:54

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