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I have a program that takes multiple files as input. What I'm trying to do is use the same filestream? I keep getting an error when trying to open the stream with the second file. Why is not code not valid and creating an error at compile time? argv[2] is a const char*.

error: no match for call to '(std::ifstream) (char*&)'

ifstream fin(argv[1]);
  //work with filestream
fin.close();

fin(argv[2]);
  //work with filestream
fin.close();
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Wow, maybe calling the constructor was a bad habit to get in to as a short hand. Thanks that solved my problem. –  LF4 Apr 27 '12 at 18:37
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first line ifstream fin(argv[1]); is evoking ifstream's constructor, and the constructor can only be called once per object. Your code is trying to call it a second time. Try using open() instead:

fin.open(argv[2]);

As an aside, you may also want to call clear() before you reopen your ifstream. The reason for this is that if the first open() (or even close()) fails, error bits on the ifstream will be set, and won't be cleared by close().

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Wow, maybe calling the constructor was a bad habit to get in to as a short hand. Thanks that solved my problem. –  LF4 Apr 27 '12 at 18:43
1  
@LF4 I would say the opposite, its an excellent habit. RAII is one of the most powerful constructs of C++ –  Andreas Brinck Apr 27 '12 at 18:44
    
@AndreasBrinck You beat me to it ;) –  luke Apr 27 '12 at 18:47
1  
@LF4: If he solved your problem, the correct thing to do is accept his answer. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 27 '12 at 18:48
    
@NicolBolas I was going to ;) Thanks for the reminder though. I have a 100% accept rate, just wish that time limit was not implemented since some people like luke answer so quickly. –  LF4 Apr 28 '12 at 15:18
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Use a local scope:

{
  ifstream fin(argv[1]);
  //work with filestream
}

{

  ifstream fin(argv[2]);
  //work with filestream
}

Note that you dont manually need to close the streams, this is handled automatically when they go out of scope.

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This is a good solution too, though local scope might look weird to the uninitiated. Not having to worry about error flags is a plus. –  luke Apr 27 '12 at 18:49
1  
As I said in my other comment, it's a good general habit to get into. I always try to limit the scope of my variables as much as possible. –  Andreas Brinck Apr 27 '12 at 18:52
1  
@AndreasBrinck A great way to limit scope is to create a function. –  Peter Wood Apr 27 '12 at 20:18
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