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I'm getting a problem with my display functions dealing with binary search trees. The main problem I'm having is getting the count variable to increment correctly in the recursive function so that I can number the nodes in ascending order.

Would making count a global variable work?

Here is the code for the function:

(p is pointing to the root of the tree, count is initially set to 1)

void displayAscend(nodePtr p, int count)
   {
      if (p->left != NULL)
         displayAscend(p->left, count);

      cout << count << ". " << p->acctNum << endl;
      count++;

      if (p->right != NULL)
         displayAscend(p->right, count);
   }
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what is it doing? –  twain249 Apr 27 '12 at 19:12
    
Are you trying to show how many levels you've gone down the tree (in which case do as Scott M suggests) or are you trying to number each node individually ... if so you need to pass count by reference ... –  Goz Apr 27 '12 at 19:13
    
(This looks like a homework problem. If so, would you tag it as such?) –  thb Apr 27 '12 at 19:14
    
i'm trying to number each node individually, like 1 for the least node, 2 for the second least, and so on... –  Tyler Gavin Apr 27 '12 at 19:16
    
@Tyler This is almost correct, see my answer. –  Andreas Brinck Apr 27 '12 at 19:18
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pass the count by reference int&.

void displayAscend(nodePtr p, int& count)
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thanks! that works –  Tyler Gavin Apr 27 '12 at 20:21
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change

displayAscend(p->left, count);

to

displayAscend(p->left, count+1);

and the same with the line containing p->right.

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that didn't work :/ –  Tyler Gavin Apr 27 '12 at 19:15
    
This will print the same number for several nodes. –  Andreas Brinck Apr 27 '12 at 19:15
    
apologies, i thought he wanted it to increase for each level. –  Scott M. Apr 27 '12 at 19:31
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I suspect that you want something like this:

size_t displayAscend(nodePtr p, int count)
{
   size_t additional_count = 0;
   if (p->left != NULL)
      additional_count += displayAscend(p->left, count + additional_count);

   cout << count + additional_count << ". " << p->acctNum << endl;
   additional_count++;

   if (p->right != NULL)
      additional_count += displayAscend(p->right, count + additional_count);

   return additional_count;
}

You can use int in place of size_t if you prefer.

The reason is that each recursive call must return a count to its caller, for otherwise the caller cannot tell how many the recursive call has counted. The outermost caller, of course, can just discard the count if uninterested.

Passing by reference is another way to do it, as another answer observes, though not my preferred way. (I personally prefer to implement that strategy with explicit pointers.)

You ask whether making count a global variable would work. The answer is that, yes, it would work for the restricted purpose of your limited exercise, but it would represent abysmal programming practice. After all, what if you had several trees, each with its own count?

Update: Thanks to @JerryCoffin for pointing out the former error in my code. I have fixed it above. What is more, I have tested it with the following:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

struct node {
   node *left;
   node *right;
   int acctNum;
};

typedef node *nodePtr;

size_t displayAscend(nodePtr p, int count)
{
   size_t additional_count = 0;
   if (p->left != NULL)
      additional_count += displayAscend(p->left, count + additional_count);

   cout << count + additional_count << ". " << p->acctNum << endl;
   additional_count++;

   if (p->right != NULL)
      additional_count += displayAscend(p->right, count + additional_count);

   return additional_count;
}

int main() {
   node head;
   node n1;
   node n2;
   node n11;
   node n21;
   node n22;
   head.left  = &n1;
   head.right = &n2;
   n1  .left  = &n11;
   n1  .right = 0;
   n2  .left  = &n21;
   n2  .right = &n22;
   n11 .left  = 0;
   n11 .right = 0;
   n21 .left  = 0;
   n21 .right = 0;
   n22 .left  = 0;
   n22 .right = 0;
   n11 .acctNum = 100;
   n1  .acctNum = 202;
   head.acctNum = 300;
   n21 .acctNum = 400;
   n2  .acctNum = 500;
   n22 .acctNum = 600;
   displayAscend(&head, 0);
}

The output is

0. 100
1. 202
2. 300
3. 400
4. 500
5. 600

So, it works.

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@JerryCoffin: Good point, my error. Let me work on that now. –  thb Apr 27 '12 at 20:18
    
@JerryCoffin: The tree recursion is now fixed per your advice, and properly tested, this time, too. Thanks. –  thb Apr 27 '12 at 20:37
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You'll have to pass the count variable by reference.

void displayAscend(nodePtr p, int & count)
   {
      if (p->left != NULL)
         displayAscend(p->left, count);

      cout << count << ". " << p->acctNum << endl;
      count++;

      if (p->right != NULL)
         displayAscend(p->right, count);
   }
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