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The situation

I have class that deals internally with many different types of file paths: some local, some remote; some relative, some absolute.

It used to be the case that many of its methods pass them around to each other as strings, but it got very difficult to keep track of exactly what type of path each method was expecting.

The desired fix

So we essentially wanted to typedef four different types to string: RemoteRelative, LocalRelative, RemoteAbsolute, and LocalAbsolute. This way the static type checker could help developers make sure that they're providing and expecting strings with the correct semantics.

Unfortunately, string is sealed in the BCL, so we couldn't do this with simple inheritance. And there's no simple typedef, so we couldn't do it that way, either.

The actual fix

I ended up creating four different simple classes that each contain a readonly string.

public struct LocalAbsolutePath {
    public readonly string path;
    public LocalAbsolutePath(string path) {
        this.path = path;
    }
}

That mostly works, but it ends up adding a little bit of undesired verbosity.

The question: Am I overlooking any alternatives that fit naturally into simple C# syntax?

Like I mentioned above, a C-style typedef string LocalAbsolutePath; or even an F#-style type LocalAbsolutePath = string would be my dream here. But even something that's a step that direction from custom classes would be great.

share|improve this question
    
isn't it possible to find a common pattern matching way? Example: if path is absolute it has to have some drive letter in-front, if not, it should be relative, the same for network path... – Tigran Apr 27 '12 at 19:28
    
@Tigran, absolutely yes, but that was the problem in the first place. I want the compiler to be able to tell if we're passing around the right types, not the runtime. – sblom Apr 27 '12 at 19:33
2  
Basically take my code and @dasblinkenlight's together and you have yourself a class. :) – Avner Shahar-Kashtan Apr 27 '12 at 19:38
1  
Basically take my code and @AvnerShahar-Kashtan's together and you have yourself a class. :) – dasblinkenlight Apr 27 '12 at 19:44
    
Honestly I would avoid to code the stuff like offered here and woudl implement a method to identify a path, and just invest a time for unit testing. In my opinion cast operators on strings, hiddent in deep of your class on the string (millions of them in your code) would lead to mess then to goodness. – Tigran Apr 27 '12 at 19:48
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've created a NuGet package called LikeType that provides typedef-like behavior in C# classes.

This is how you would use it:

class CustomerId : LikeType<CustomerId, string>
{
    public CustomerId(string id) : base(id) { }
}

Here is how the type will behave:

void ShowTypeBehavior()
{
    var customerId = new CustomerId("cust-001"); // create instance with given backing value
    string custIdValue = customerId; // implicit cast from class to backing type, sets 'custIdValue' to "cust-001"

    var otherCustomerId = new CustomerId("cust-002");
    var areEqual = customerId == otherCustomerId; // false
    var areNotEqual = customerId != otherCustomerId; // true
    var areEqualUsingMethod = customerId.Equals(otherCustomerId); // false

    var customerIdCopy = new CustomerId("cust-001"); // create separate instance with same backing value
    var isCopyEqual = customerId == customerIdCopy; // true. Instances are considered equal if their backing values are equal.
}

The class MyClass : LikeType<MyClass,...> syntax is needed to prevent compile-time comparisons of two different types that may have the same backing type. For example, given the CustomerId class above, and this class:

class PhoneNumber : LikeType<PhoneNumber, string>
{
    public PhoneNumber(string number) : base(number) {} 
}

the following will not compile:

void CantCompareTwoDifferentTypesThatHaveSameBacking(CustomerId, customerId, PhoneNumber phoneNumber)
{
    var areEqual = customerId == phoneNumber; // does not compile
}
share|improve this answer

Your solution is good. You can fight the additional verbosity by adding a type conversion to string, letting you use LocalAbsolutePath wherever a string could go.

public struct LocalAbsolutePath { // Making it a class would be OK too
    private readonly string path; // <<=== It is now private
    public LocalAbsolutePath(string path) {
        this.path = path;
    }
    public static implicit operator string(LocalAbsolutePath p) {
        return p.path;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

What you should do is keep your current approach of creating four distinct classes for your path types (and even have them inherit the same baseclass), so that you can restrict methods to only receive one of those four Path objects.

While I don't feel that var myPath = new LocalAbsolutePath("path") is really all that more verbose than var myPath = "path", since what it lacks in brevity it makes up for in explicitness, but if you really want, you can implement the implicit casting operator between your class and string, and have this work:

 public static implicit operator LocalAbsolutePath(string path)
 {
     return new LocalAbsolutePath(path);
 }

And now you can just do:

LocalAbsolutePath myPath = "Path String";
share|improve this answer

Maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree here, but typedef is implemented as type aliases in C#, as far as I know. Setting up a type alias is as simple as this:

using LocalAbsolutePath = System.String;

Then you can start using LocalAbsolutePath as a valid type. More or less like this:

LocalAbsolutePath thisPath = "c:\\thisPath";

Based on your post, I'm sensing this was what you were looking for. Hope I'm right...!

share|improve this answer
    
One caveat: you can't alias an alias. Hence the statement using LocalAbsolutePath = string won't work because string is the global type alias for System.String. Other than that, you should be good. – code4life Apr 27 '12 at 19:49
    
Can I do that 4 times with 4 different names? And will the compiler consider each of those 4 different names distinct types? – sblom Apr 27 '12 at 21:08
    
Yes, you can, the compiler will recognize it. – code4life Apr 30 '12 at 4:41
    
They're not distinct types though. But then neither are typedefs. It's a common mistake -- just because it LOOKS like a different type to you doesn't mean that the compiler will treat it as one. – Miral Mar 7 '13 at 4:22
    
@Miral: yeah, I missed clarifying that point. Thanks! – code4life Mar 7 '13 at 14:32

Since I set out with the same objectives in a project I'm working on, and I benefited greatly from the answers here, I thought I'd share the solution I ended up with. Dealing with null, especially in unit test asserts, nearly drove me nuts. The following will of course fail:

string someStringVar = null;
MyStringType myStringType = new MyStringType(someStringVar);
MyStringType myStringTypeNull = null;
Assert.AreEqual(myStringType, myStringTypeNull);

Using a static Parse() in lieu of a public constructor was more satisfying because it let me return null. This passes:

string someStringVar = null;
MyStringType myStringType = MyStringType.Parse(someStringVar);
MyStringType myStringTypeNull = null;
Assert.AreEqual(myStringType, myStringTypeNull);

Also, I didn't want implicit conversion from string to MyStringType - this seemed to me to remove some of the conscious-coder benefit of doing this in the first place. Allowing the implicit conversion from string would mean that a call to a method with a MyStringType parameter would accept a string, and I didn't want this because a method with lots of string parameters is so prone to error. The reverse conversion done implicitly made more sense to me.

Finally, I thought this was an ideal case for a generic that was easily reused.

Anyway, here's what I ended up with:

public class StringType<T> where T:class
{
    private readonly string _str;

    protected StringType(string str)
    {
        _str = str;
    }

    public static implicit operator string(StringType<T> obj)
    {
        return obj == null ? null : obj._str;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _str;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return _str.GetHashCode();
    }
}


public class MyStringType : StringType<MyStringType>
{
    protected MyStringType(string str) : base(str) { }

    public static MyStringType Parse(object obj)
    {
        var str = obj is string ? (string)obj : (obj == null ? null : obj.ToString());
        return str == null ? null : new MyStringType(str);
    }
}

Comments/improvements/simplifications of course welcome!

share|improve this answer

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