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According to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9ekhdcxs(v=vs.80).aspx,

C2079 can also occur if you attempt to declare an object on the stack of a type whose forward declaration is only in scope.

class A;

class B {
    A a;   // C2079
};

class A {};

Possible resolution:

class A;

class C {};

class B {
   A * a;
   C c;
};
class A {};

My question is how do I eliminate this error when I have the following situation:

class A;  // Object

class B   // Container
{
   public:
     typedef int SomeTypedef;
   private:
     A a;   // C2079
};

class A {
   void Foo(B::SomeTypedef);
};

I can't declare A before declaring B because A needs to use B's typedef, and I can't declare B before A because of this error.

One possible solution is to use a pointer to A instead of a stack variable, but I don't want a pointer (in this case).

Another solution is to not use typedef, or not to put it inside class B. But what if it belongs in B and I want not to pollute my project's namespace, as in B::SomeTypedef is a more appropriate name than SomeTypedef?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Apr 27 '12 at 19:30

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

1  
Can you use a namespace to handle scope for SomeTypedef? –  chrisaycock Apr 27 '12 at 17:52
    
Are you suggesting to put the typedef in a separate namespace, something like B'? This is my current solution. I'd like to know if there's something better... How is this problem typically handled? –  Dmitri Shuralyov Apr 27 '12 at 17:52
    
Well, if you have a namespace for your library/project that is separate from global. –  chrisaycock Apr 27 '12 at 17:53
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your design is questionable, although perhaps nested classes is what you intend:

class B {
   public:
     typedef int SomeTypedef;
   private:
     class A {
       void Foo(SomeTypedef);
     };
     A a;
};

If not, this can also be solved with another class which is common in CRTP code.

template<typename T>
struct foo;

class A;
class B;

template<>
struct foo<B> {
  typedef int SomeTypedef;
};

class A {
   void Foo(foo<B>::SomeTypedef);
};

class B : foo<B> {
   private:
     A a;
};

Or you can use another namespace.

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2  
All you needed was a base class, the templates didn't add anything. –  Ben Voigt Apr 27 '12 at 21:05
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Another method is use an intermediate class, plus pointers, its more long, but, it works:

This is header file, ( yes I know, "*.hpp" extension is not standard ):


ForwardClassExample.hpp

class ForwardClass {
public:
  virtual void DoSomething();
};

class ContainerClass {
   ForwardClass* Item;

   /* constructor */ ContainerClass();
   /* destructor */ ~ContainerClass();
};

class RealClass: ForwardClass {
  /* override */ virtual void DoSomething();
};

This is body file:


ForwardClassExample.cpp

/* constructor */ ContainerClass::ContainerClass()
{
  // create reference to forwaded class item
  this.Item = new RealClass();
}

/* destructor */ ContainerClass::~ContainerClass()
{
  // deletereference to forwaded class item
  free this.Item();
}

void ForwardClass::DoSomething()
{
  // ...
}

void RealClass::DoSomething()
{
  // ...
}

Note:

I suggest to get used to apply pointers to variables, instead of direct fields, its may looks more difficult, at start, but, eventually allows to do more stuff.

It also prepare you to use "references" in case, one day you have to work with other programming languages.

Cheers.

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I'm downvoting for a few reasons: 1) Code isn't valid C++ 2) The unnecessary inheritance 3) Using dumb pointers instead of smart ones 4) The OP mentioned he did not want to use pointers (PIMPL). –  Pubby Apr 27 '12 at 19:06
1  
@Pubby (a) I know there may be some unvalid code, I DO have done this C++, but, I currently work in C#, Java, and PHP, and sometimes, I mix them. (b) The unnecesary inheritance, its the point of the answer, its an alternative, that may provide other advantages, even if additional code. (c) I did take check he didn't want pointers, but, I insist, because there are a lot of C++ apps, use pointers for members, and also allow to do a lot of additional stuff. Feel free to upvote & downvote, but, please, sounds more like "I downvote to probe Im better programmer". –  umlcat Apr 27 '12 at 19:19
1  
I think this is a valid suggestion for an alternative, if not the best and most appropriate, solution. Thanks. I don't want to use pointers in this particular case, and hence I want a solution that doesn't use pointers. I don't hesitate using pointers in other cases, or when they're needed. –  Dmitri Shuralyov Apr 27 '12 at 19:36
1  
@shurcooL Good Luck. –  umlcat Apr 27 '12 at 20:07
1  
@umlcat Thank you for your help. Even though it's not the solution I used, it was valuable knowledge gained. –  Dmitri Shuralyov Apr 27 '12 at 20:55
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Introduce the typedef where your design requires it, and then export it to wherever it makes the most sense for your user.

class A
{
public:
   typedef int SomeTypedef;
   void Foo(SomeTypedef);
};

class B
{
public:
   typedef A::SomeTypedef SomeTypedef;
private:
   A a;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, I didn't think about doing that. Thanks. So you end up with A::SomeTypedef and B::SomeTypedef that are the same type. –  Dmitri Shuralyov Apr 27 '12 at 21:09
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