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 library(Sleuth2)

 mlr<-lm(ex1222$Buchanan2000~ex1222$Perot96*ex1222$Gore2000)


for (i in 0:3) {
           assign(paste("betaHat", i, sep=""), 
           summary(mlr)$coeff[i+1,1])
               }

x<-sort(ex1222$Perot96)
y<-sort(ex1222$Gore2000)


z1 <- outer(x, y, function(a,b) betaHat0+betaHat1*a+betaHat2*b+betaHat3*a*b)
nrz <- nrow(z)
ncz <- ncol(z)

# Create a function interpolating colors in the range of specified colors
jet.colors <- colorRampPalette( c("blue", "red") ) 

# Generate the desired number of colors from this palette
nbcol <- 100
color <- jet.colors(nbcol)

# Compute the z-value at the facet centres
zfacet <- z[-1, -1] + z[-1, -ncz] + z[-nrz, -1] + z[-nrz, -ncz]

# Recode facet z-values into color indices
facetcol <- cut(zfacet, nbcol)

persp(x, y, z1, col=color[facetcol],theta=-30, lwd=.3,xlab="Perot 96", ylab="Gore 2000", zlab="Predicted Votes for Buchanan")

Hello,

I am trying to color the above plot. I was thinking I want to have higher values of 'z' colored darker shades of red (or any color really).

Any help on how to make that happen would be greatly appreciated.

Also, feel free to suggest a different function to make this happen as well.

Thank you!

edit....I put my new code after looking at the example on ?persp. I'd like to change the color and I'm not super happy with the readability of the new plot

share|improve this question
2  
Example 4 in ?persp is titled "Surface colors corresponding to z-values" and demonstrates just what you're asking for. Shouldn't be too hard to adapt it to your own data. –  Josh O'Brien Apr 27 '12 at 19:59
    
good suggestion. I will look into that. –  Michael Apr 27 '12 at 20:50
    
Looked into that example. It is sort of what I want, but they use two colors. I want a single color. –  Michael Apr 28 '12 at 1:30
2  
You might try out a few color palettes with something like this: plot(1:20, pch=16, col=colorRampPalette(c("white", "blue"))(20), cex=3) plot(1:20, pch=16, col=colorRampPalette(blues9)(20), cex=3). Once you've got one you like, you can sub it into the persp() call. (colorRampPalette() is a bit hard to grok at first, since by itself it returns a function rather than a palette of colors, but it's pretty cool once you get the hang of it.) –  Josh O'Brien Apr 28 '12 at 2:03
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I modified your code a bit.

library(Sleuth2)

It's generally better practice to use the data argument than to use predictor variables extracted from a data frame via $:

mlr<-lm(Buchanan2000~Perot96*Gore2000,data=ex1222)

We can use expand.grid() and predict() to get the regression results in a clean way:

perot <- seq(1000,40000,by=1000)
gore <-  seq(1000,400000,by=2000)

If you want the facets evaluated at the locations of the observations, you can use perot <- sort(unique(ex1222$Perot96)); gore <- sort(unique(ex1222$Gore2000)) instead.

pframe <- with(ex1222,expand.grid(Perot96=perot,Gore2000=gore))
mlrpred <- predict(mlr,newdata=pframe)

Now convert the predictions to a matrix:

nrz <- length(perot)
ncz <- length(gore)
z <- matrix(mlrpred,nrow=nrz)

I chose to go from light red (#ffcccc, red with quite a bit of blue/green) to dark red (#cc0000, a bit of red with nothing else).

jet.colors <- colorRampPalette( c("#ffcccc", "#cc0000") ) 

You could also use grep("red",colors(),value=TRUE) to see what reds R has built in.

# Generate the desired number of colors from this palette
nbcol <- 100
color <- jet.colors(nbcol)

# Compute the z-value at the facet centres
zfacet <- z[-1, -1] + z[-1, -ncz] + z[-nrz, -1] + z[-nrz, -ncz]
# Recode facet z-values into color indices
facetcol <- cut(zfacet, nbcol)

persp(perot, gore, z,
      col=color[facetcol],theta=-30, lwd=.3,
      xlab="Perot 96", ylab="Gore 2000", zlab="Predicted Votes for Buchanan")

enter image description here

You say you're "not super happy with the readability" of the plot, but that's not very specific ... I would spend a while with the ?persp page to see what some of your options are ...

Another choice is the rgl package:

library(rgl)
## see ?persp3d for discussion of colour handling
vertcol <- cut(z, nbcol)
persp3d(perot, gore, z,
      col=color[vertcol],smooth=FALSE,lit=FALSE,
      xlab="Perot 96", ylab="Gore 2000", zlab="Predicted Votes for Buchanan")

enter image description here

It might also be worth taking a look at scatter3d from the car package (there are other posts on SO describing how to tweak some of its graphical properties).

library(car)
scatter3d(Buchanan2000~Perot96*Gore2000,data=ex1222)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Ben, Your method of obtaining the model predictions is definitely way slicker than what I was using! Thank you for the help. I think I prefer to keep the original data in the plot though, as it lets you see a little more about what is going on I feel like. By "not super happy with the readability of the plot" I suppose I feel that it is just unavoidably awkward to display this 3-d model that has varying curvature on the response surface with a single 2-D plot. A plot that could be clicked on and dragged to rotate the picture would be awesome. Thanks again! –  Michael Apr 29 '12 at 12:53
    
Well, you're not really keeping the "original data" -- just the x and y locations. See edits. Either rgl::persp3d or car:scatter3d will give you a dynamic-perspective plot ... –  Ben Bolker Apr 29 '12 at 14:03
    
Thanks again! For some reason I am having some difficulties loading the 'rgl' package onto my mac. Seems to be a bit of a current issue with that package in general. I agree it isn't the original data, maybe your way is better. –  Michael May 1 '12 at 4:50
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