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Please help me in understanding this piece of code.

var person = {
    'first-name': 'FirstName',
    'last-name': 'LastName',
    'gender': 'Male'
};

var anotherPerson = new Object(person);
anotherPerson.desig = 'Designation';

console.log('Another person designation: ' + anotherPerson['desig'] + ', person designation: ' + person['desig']);

I expected the output to be Another person designation: Designation, person designation: undefined but to my surprise I found it to be `Another person designation: Designation, person designation: Designation.

According to me anotherPerson is extending person object and properties set to anotherPerson should not be visible to person object. Am I wrong here? Or is that both the object are pointing to the same location?

[EDIT]

Now there are even more surprises.

I added the following code to the above.

person.place = 'XYZ';
console.log(person['place'] + ', ' + anotherPerson['place']); // Expected: XYZ, undefined. Result: XYZ, XYZ.

Based on the above result and answers I thought that both objects are referring to the same location. Now I added few more lines

person = undefined;
console.log(anotherPerson['place']) //Expected: error, Result: XYZ. ??!?!?
console.log(person['place']) // Expected: error, Result: error.

Can someone throw some light on me to understand this? Thanks for your help in advance

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There's no inheritance here. Just two references to the same object. –  Cameron Apr 27 '12 at 19:59
    
Then how can you clone the object and make a new one? I, like the OP probably, assumed that new would make a NEW object. –  DanRedux Apr 27 '12 at 20:01
    
See: stackoverflow.com/questions/728360/… –  Kendall Frey Apr 27 '12 at 20:03
    
Object.create() is the correct way ncombo.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/… –  Jon Jul 11 '13 at 13:53
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are not doing extending or any kind of inheritance.

This comes closer:

var Person = function () {
    this["first-name"] = 'FirstName',
    this["last-name"] = 'LastName',
    this["gender"] = 'Male'
};

var person = new Person();
var anotherPerson = new Person();

Now you have two seperate instances of Person. If you also want anotherPerson to be a subclass ..

var Person = function () {
    this["first-name"] = 'FirstName',
    this["last-name"] = 'LastName',
    this["gender"] = 'Male'
};

var AnotherPerson = function () {
    this.desig = "Designation";
}
AnotherPerson.prototype = new Person();   // inherit from Person
AnotherPerson.prototype.constructor = AnotherPerson;  // reset constructor

var person = new Person();
var anotherPerson = new AnotherPerson();

console.log(person.desig); // undefined
console.log(anotherPerson.desig); // Designation
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1  
I had just finished writing up the same first block of code ;) +1 –  bhamlin Apr 27 '12 at 20:05
    
@Frits Thanks for your reply. I get the code you have explained. So when we do new Object(person) is it that anotherPerson is referring to the same location? I tried adding a new property to person and anotherPerson was able to read that new property successfully. Why is it so? –  Anji Apr 27 '12 at 20:08
    
I'm not entirely sure what new Object(person) does .. maybe it just resolves to person? I do know that it doesn't magically extend from person :P –  Halcyon Apr 27 '12 at 20:09
    
@FritsvanCampen Hmm very weird. I some times doubts whether I really know javascript when these kind of results are shown –  Anji Apr 27 '12 at 20:24
    
I don't like the way native prototypes work in JavaScript, supposedly it has a memory leak too! Find a framework to do inheritance for you. –  Halcyon Apr 27 '12 at 20:26
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Not really a solution, but for me, this is how I clone an object in such a way that I can extend it:

var anotherPerson = new Object();
for(i in person) anotherPerson[i]=person[i];

Instead of

var anotherPerson = new Object(person);

It then works as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
May I know what exactly happens when we do var anotherPerson = new Object(person)? –  Anji Apr 27 '12 at 20:05
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The Object function (note: the same, even more startlingly if you're not familiar with what's going on, applies to calling new Object(...)) doesn't create a new object if it's passed something that isn't of boolean, number or string type; it just returns the already existing object. (Rationale: because it's already an Object. Almost everything is an Object in Javascript.)

Therefore, anotherPerson is the exact same object as person, so when you modify it you modify person too.

I do not claim that this is sensible behaviour; but it is what the language spec defines.

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If you want to extend/inherit an object then you can do

var person = {
    'first-name': 'FirstName',
    'last-name': 'LastName',
    'gender': 'Male'
};
if (typeof Object.create !== 'function')
{
    Object.create=function(o)
    {
        function F(){}
        F.prototype=o;
        return new F();
    }
}
var newPerson=Object.create(person);
newPerson.age=25;
newPerson.gender="Female";

console.log(person.gender); // Male
console.log(newPerson.gender); // Female

console.log(person.age); // undefined
console.log(newPerson.age); // 25

Fiddle

Reference: Prototypal Inheritance in JavaScript

share|improve this answer
    
The Douglas Crockford way! Perfect. –  Anji Apr 27 '12 at 20:37
    
Yep, that's right. –  WereWolf - The Alpha Apr 27 '12 at 20:38
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a general solution for inheritance implementation in JavaScript

function inherits(base, extension)
{
   for ( var property in base )
   {
      try
      {
         extension[property] = base[property];
      }
      catch( warning ){}
   }
}
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