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I am displaying information as a checkbox with ThreeState enabled, and want to use a nullable boolean in simplest way possible.

Currently I am using a nested ternary expression; but is there a clearer way?

bool? foo = null;
checkBox1.CheckState = foo.HasValue ?
    (foo == true ? CheckState.Checked : CheckState.Unchecked) :
    CheckState.Indeterminate;

* Note that the checkbox and form is read-only.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's how I would do it.

I would add an extension method to clean it up a bit.

    public static CheckState ToCheckboxState(this bool booleanValue)
    {
        return booleanValue.ToCheckboxState();
    }

    public static CheckState ToCheckboxState(this bool? booleanValue)
    {
        return booleanValue.HasValue ?
               (booleanValue == true ? CheckState.Checked : CheckState.Unchecked) :
               CheckState.Indeterminate;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
It is repeating all over the place, so I do want to simplify for that reason. – JYelton Apr 27 '12 at 20:18
    
just writing the extension method code for you, 1 sec – Nathan Koop Apr 27 '12 at 20:19
    
I'm familiar with extension methods, though I'm not sure how I would handle a case where ThreeState is not enabled. – JYelton Apr 27 '12 at 20:20
    
I see what you're thinking - I was building an extension method to the Checkbox itself. I'll post it as an alternate answer. Not sure what's going to be the best yet. :) – JYelton Apr 27 '12 at 20:27
    
I went with this, it's definitely the best fit. Cheers. – JYelton Apr 27 '12 at 20:35

More clear is an arguable statement. For example I could say that this is more clear.

if(foo.HasValue)
{
    if(foo == true) 
       checkBox1.CheckState = CheckState.Checked;
    else
       checkBox1.CheckState = CheckState.Unchecked;
}
else
    checkBox1.CheckState  = CheckState.Indeterminate;

Another option would be to create a method just for this:

checkBox1.CheckState = GetCheckState(foo);

public CheckState GetCheckState(bool? foo)
{
    if(foo.HasValue)
    {
        if(foo == true) 
           return CheckState.Checked;
        else
           return CheckState.Unchecked;
    }
    else
        return CheckState.Indeterminate

}

However I like your code.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the GetCheckState() method idea. – JYelton Apr 27 '12 at 20:31
    
You could also extend that method and pass inside also the checkbox. So you could test if the ThreeState is enabled. – Steve Apr 27 '12 at 20:42

Based on @Nathan's suggestion of an extension method, I came up with this:

public static void SetCheckedNull(this CheckBox c, bool? Value)
{
    if (!c.ThreeState)
        c.Checked = Value == true;
    else
        c.CheckState = Value.HasValue ?
            (Value == true ? CheckState.Checked : CheckState.Unchecked) :
            CheckState.Indeterminate;
}

The only thing I don't like about it, is that when setting a "normal" checkbox:

checkBox1.Checked = someBool;

Versus setting a ThreeState-enabled checkbox:

checkBox2.SetCheckedNull(someNullableBool);

The latter just feels different enough that it tweaks the OCD a bit. :)

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