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Is it possible to define a function in the scope of a parent function and bind an argument passed through the parent function as its scope before returning it?

Here is an example:

var myObject = {
    foo: "bar"
};

var myFunction = (function() {
    return function() {
        return this.foo;
    };
}).call(myObject);

myFunction.call(myObject); // I'd like to bind myObject as this does ...

myFunction(); // ... but I'd like to do it before invoking it, without .call() or .apply()

Or another complex example, that describes what I'm trying to do:

var createMyCopy = function(original, self) {
    var copy;

    eval("copy=" + original.toString());

    console.log(copy()); // returns undefined
};

(function() {
    var self = "Hello world",
        myFunction = function() {
            return self;
        };

    console.log(myFunction()); // returns "Hello world"

    createMyCopy(myFunction);
})();

I'm trying to create a copy of a function, so that I can make changes to it without changing the original one, but I'd like to have the variables that are defined in the original one in the copy as well...

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by making changes to a function? –  Esailija Apr 27 '12 at 20:35
    
I think you need to describe your final goal. Your second example hardly seems related to the first. Are you trying to bind the calling context, or is it actually the variables in scope that you need? –  squint Apr 27 '12 at 20:37
1  
...FYI, you defined a self parameter in the createMyCopy function, but passed nothing to it. If you do createMyCopy(myFunction, self);, it works, though sort of doubt this is going to be a good approach. –  squint Apr 27 '12 at 20:40
    
My English is not that good, so it is hard for me, sorry. I am trying to get the variable in the scope of the new function created with eval. I tried and don't get it so I thought binding the old variable as this in the scope of the new function would be an alternative. But the second example is my final goal. –  headacheCoder Apr 27 '12 at 20:41
    
Yes but your goal doesn't make any sense.. you are trying to create a copy of a function so you can change it without affecting original one... but there is no way to change a function in the first place. –  Esailija Apr 27 '12 at 20:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do you mean like this?

var myObject = {
    foo: "bar"
};

var myFunction = (function() {
    var self = this;
    return function() {
        return self.foo;
    };
}).call(myObject);

I think you're getting scope and context mixed up in your question.

share|improve this answer

I think you mean this:

var myFunction = (function(obj) {
    return function() {
        return obj.foo;
    };
})(myObject);

The immediately invoked function expression is passed myObject and returns a new function in which that parameter is bound as the variable obj.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's close to what I'm looking for but it does not work on a copy made with eval()... –  headacheCoder Apr 27 '12 at 20:35
1  
@headacheCoder ah, you're using eval too?! Now I understand your pseudonym... –  Alnitak Apr 27 '12 at 20:36
    
Don't be that insulting. There is AFAIK no alternative to eval in this case. I know that eval is "evil" but I need to use it. –  headacheCoder Apr 27 '12 at 20:49
    
@headacheCoder it was supposed to be humorous, not insulting. But your updated question did give me a headache! –  Alnitak Apr 27 '12 at 21:20

I'm not sure what you mean, but you can do this:

var myObject = {
    foo: "bar"
};
function myFunction() {
    return this.foo;
}
console.log(myFunction.apply(myObject)); // bar

The first argument of apply is the context (ie. what this refers to). The second argument of apply is an array of arguments (but I've omitted that here as there are no arguments).

share|improve this answer
    
The code comment in the question states "without .call() or .apply()". OP uses .call() in the question. –  squint Apr 27 '12 at 20:31

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