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Is there a way to calculate the average/min/max of all numbers without using an array? Need to calculate up to 10,000 numbers per sec.

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1  
What have you tried? –  Dan Busha Apr 27 '12 at 20:45
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Please add the homework tag if appropriate. –  thb Apr 27 '12 at 20:49
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It's not homework –  Jennifer Canas Apr 27 '12 at 20:52
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@ColinD: it depends on the spec.. adding 32bit integers with a 64bit counter is quite safe ;) –  Karoly Horvath Apr 27 '12 at 20:53
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@ColinD: You'll lose precision very quickly. Integer divide will drop fractional part (what do you think will happen once you multiply it back?), and floating point divide will suffer from rounding errors. Also, this won't save you from overflow. Multiply 65536 by 65536, and it won't fit into int32 anymore. –  SigTerm Apr 27 '12 at 21:00
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes,

Keep a minimum variable that is initialized to a high value, and update it if you see a lower value.

Do the opposite with a maximum variable.

Add up all numbers and divide that sum by the total count to get the average.

The following code does not do bounds checks (e.g. count > 0, total doesn't overflow) but should give you an idea:

int minimum = // Initialize to large #, in C# would be int.MaxValue
int maximum = // Initialize to most negative #, in C# would be int.MinValue
int count = 0;
int total = 0;

void StatsForNewNumber(int number)
{
    if (number < minimum) minimum = number;
    if (number > maximum) maximum = number;
    count++;
    total += number;
}

int Average()
{
    return total / count;
}
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2  
what about overflow of the total? –  Colin D Apr 27 '12 at 20:48
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You will have the same problem doing the math with an array. Check for overflows if that's remotely possible for the given use cases. Use a long, or even a library that can manage arbitrarily large integers, if needed. The total can also be done in a double, if the inherent issues with doubles are acceptable. –  Eric J. Apr 27 '12 at 20:49
    
long long is now standard, and almost every compiler has it. Use that. –  Mooing Duck Apr 27 '12 at 21:17
    
@EricJ., the issues with doubles are mostly avoided if you initialize them with integers. It's like having a 53-bit integer type that handles overflow gracefully. –  Mark Ransom Apr 27 '12 at 21:23
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Sure. Keep the smallest and largest numbers you've received, along with the sum and count of numbers. When you need the smallest or largest, return it. When you need the average, divide the sum by the number.

Boost Accumulators includes implementations of all the above, plus quite a few others.

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what about overflow of the total? –  Colin D Apr 27 '12 at 20:47
    
@ColinD: Pretty much as you would using an array, which means it depends. You might ignore it, or use a larger type. There are other ways as well, but no particular reason to believe they're particularly likely to apply here. I believe the linked Accumulators library has code to deal with/prevent overflows (but don't remember for sure). –  Jerry Coffin Apr 27 '12 at 20:52
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Absolutely: all that can be computed one item at a time.

Keep the current minimum and the current maximum, compute the running total, and the count. When you need the average, divide the running total by the count, and you'll get your answer.

class calc {
    double minVal, maxVal, total;
    int count;
public:
    calc()
    :   minVal(numeric_limits<double>::max)
    ,   maxVal(numeric_limits<double>::min)
    ,   total(0)
    ,   count(0) {
    }
    void process(double num) {
        minVal = min(minVal, num);
        maxVal = max(maxVal, num);
        total += num;
        count++;
    }
    double getAvg() {
        // TODO: Check count to be > 0 here
        return total / count;
    }
    double getMin() {
        return minVal;
    }
    double getMax() {
        return maxVal;
    }
}
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1  
what about overflow of the total? –  Colin D Apr 27 '12 at 20:47
1  
@ColinD Considering that OP asks for a solution that replaces an array-based one, it does not look like the overflow of total is a concern. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 27 '12 at 20:52
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Create four variables: one to store the minVal, one for the maxVal, one for the total sum, and one to increment after each new input. compare each new input against minVal and maxVal and update as necessary. Add the input value to the total sum, increment the counter. The average is always the total sum/counter, so you can query this value on the fly if you need to or just calculate it at the end when you're done.

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He is working with a large amount of values. What happens when the total overflows? –  Colin D Apr 27 '12 at 20:49
    
@ColinD: simply use int64_t (or long long) to store total, and read input in ints, duh. –  SigTerm Apr 27 '12 at 20:56
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You don't really need to store any numbers in an array to find the average/min/max, as you are iterating through the numbers you do

if(currentSmallest > currentNumber)
     currentSmallest = currentNumber

if(currentLargest < currentNumber)
     currentLargest = currentNumber

and in addition you will keep a counter and the total sum, and by dividing those numbers you will get the average. No need to store them in an array.

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What about overflow of the total? –  Colin D Apr 27 '12 at 20:49
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