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I'm looking to set a single error message for a form, but still validate each field.

The form is a survey with 10 questions. Each of them validates the same way (->setRequired(true)). So basically, I just to validate that each questions has an answer and display one message at the top of the form if one of them is not answered.

I've tried several solutions and gotten the same result. My error is added to the form, but also, all of the individual errors show as well.

This is my latest shot at it:

public function isValid($data)
{
    $errors = 0;

    parent::isValid($data);

    foreach ($this->getElements() as $element) {

        if ($element->hasErrors()) {

            $element->clearErrorMessages();

            $element->setErrors(array());

            $errors++;
        }
    }

    if (count($errors) > 0) {
        $this->setErrorMessages(array('Please answer all questions before proceeding.'));
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

Can anyone shed some light on why this isn't working as I'd expect? There has to be a more elegant way of doing this.

EDIT:

This is what I ended up with. Probably a little different than most since my form elements are dynamically populated based on an array of questions, but the general idea should apply. Normally, you could just count the number of radio elements, but in my case, rather than looping through the elements and checking the type, it was just easier to count my array of questions.

public function isValid($data)
{
    $valid_values = 0;

    parent::isValid($data);

    foreach ($this->getValues() as $value) {
        if ($value >= 1 && $value <= 10) {
            $valid_values++;
        }
    }

    if ($valid_values <> count($this->_questions)) {
        $this->setErrorMessages(array('Please answer all questions before proceeding.'));
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

Still not sure this is the most elegant way, but it works for my particular case.

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Figured it out on my own, but don't have enough rep to post my answer. :( –  Luke Apr 27 '12 at 21:50
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The way I see it, if you really have only that one validator one each field, why don't manage that in the controller, instead of overriding isValid ?

if ($form->isValid($_POST)) { /* success */ } else { /* error as at least one field is missing */ }

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Good idea; however, I did end up validating multiple things, so I came up with a solution in the isValid() method. Updated my question. I suppose I might have been able to do this in the controller, but I like to have the validation in the form. Plus I'm not sure how I could have hid the element errors, but still shown an error stating the the whole form failed validation. I guess this is part of what I'm struggling with and the reason for my original question. –  Luke May 1 '12 at 3:01
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You can remove the error elements by removing the 'Error' decorator from the form elements while creating it. This will validate all the elements but will not produce any error messages. But you have to cannot show errors in the form element. You have to find someother way to feedback the errors.

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You could remove the Error decorator from each element (so those errors don't display). Then add a custom decorator to the form (!) that checks $form->isValid() (though in the decorator itself, it will be $this->getElement()->isValid(); kind of confusing that getElement() returns the entity to which the decorator is attached) and then renders your single message (probably above your form, using default placement PREPEND).

It sounds like you have the second part handled (rendering your single message at the form-level), so simply removing the Error decorator from the elements themselves should do the job for you.

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