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I have a cache class which contains a volatile HashMap<T> to store cache items.

I'm curious what would be the consequences of changing volatile HashMap to ConcurrentHashMap?

Would i gain performance increase? This cache is readonly cache.

What would be the best option to use? just HashMap? Cache is being populated on a interval.

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If it's read-only you need ... neither. –  Brian Roach Apr 27 '12 at 21:06
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volatile on a HashMap means that you cross a memory barrier when you get/set the HashMap object. It does nothing when you add or remove things from the map –  Gray Apr 27 '12 at 21:06
    
@BrianRoach what would u use? –  DarthVader Apr 27 '12 at 21:09
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2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

First, it appears you don't understand what the volatile keyword does. It makes sure that if the reference value held by the variable declared volatile changes, other threads will see it rather than having a cached copy. It has nothing to do with thread-safety in regard to accessing the HashMap

Given that, and the fact that you say the HashMap is read-only ... you certainly don't need to use anything that provides thread-safety including a ConcurrentHashMap

Edit to add: Your last edit you now say "The cache is being populated on a interval"

That's not read-only then, is it?

If you're going to have threads reading from it while you are writing (updating the existing HashMap) then you should use a ConcurrentHashMap, yes.

If you are populating an entirely new HashMap then assigning it to the existing variable, then you use volatile

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well that was the reason why i was using volatile, there was a background thread reading from file and making a new hashmap then assigning to the cache. I m planning to change the design, that s why i asked . You answered both cases though. Thanks. –  DarthVader Apr 27 '12 at 21:22
    
Well actually you can use volatile to make sure people see the most current elements (basically the same way you do to get "volatile" array elements), it's just a) bad performance, b) convoluted, c) doesn't help with the internal race conditions when adding data and d) plain stupid. But doable! ;) –  Voo Apr 27 '12 at 21:30
    
@Voo what would u use? or how would u do it? –  DarthVader Apr 27 '12 at 21:34
    
@Darth Note my comment was about using volatile to add entries on a hashmap and make sure they're visible - not what you want to do. b2t: I'd simply go with ConcurrentHashmap first - it was built for that purpose. If I had a high performance bottleneck in the map, I'd go for Cliff's lockfree HashMap implementation, in any case with a background thread to remove old entries from the cache. Less memory overhead, no big spikes and still quite good performance. If you really only want to create a new cache every X minutes, Michael's solution will work fine. –  Voo Apr 27 '12 at 21:48
    
@BrianRoach I don't get your comment that a read-only map does not need to be thread-safe. Some thread has to put some data in the map at some point and if that data is added after the map has been passed around to other threads, you are in trouble. –  toto2 Apr 27 '12 at 22:01
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You say the cache is read-only, but also being updated on an interval which seems contradictory.

If the whole cache gets updated on an interval, I'd keep using the volatile. The volatile will make sure that the updated map is safely published.

public final class  Cache
{
   private volatile Map<?,?> cache;

   private void mapUpdate() {
      Map<?,?> newCache = new HashMap<>();

      // populate the map

      // update the reference with an immutable collection
      cache = Collections.unmodifiableMap(newCache);
   }
}

If the interval update is modifying the same cache, then you probably want to use a ConcurrentHashMap, or copy the map, update the copy, and update the reference.

public final class  Cache
{
   private volatile Map<?,?> cache;

   private void mapUpdate() {
      Map<?,?> newCache = new HashMap<>(cache);

      // update the map

      // update the reference with an immutable collection
      cache = Collections.unmodifiableMap(newCache);
   }
}
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