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I've recently installed several Python packages on Kubuntu 12.04 (iPython, matplotlib, numpy, ipython-notebook, ipython-qtconsole, python-scipy). Now when I try and run a python script from the command line (./script.py) I get thrown into the python interpreter.

example:

user@machine:~/$ ./script.py 

Welcome to Python 2.7!  This is the online help utility.

If this is your first time using Python, you should definitely check out
the tutorial on the Internet at http://docs.python.org/tutorial/.

Enter the name of any module, keyword, or topic to get help on writing
Python programs and using Python modules.  To quit this help utility and
return to the interpreter, just type "quit".

To get a list of available modules, keywords, or topics, type "modules",
"keywords", or "topics".  Each module also comes with a one-line summary
of what it does; to list the modules whose summaries contain a given word
such as "spam", type "modules spam".

help> 

Why is this happening?

What can I do to make this stop?

Is there any option other than removing iPython?

EDIT: I should mention the script is a python module. I don't know if that has anything to do with it. I am able to run a simple hello world script just fine.

@Adam Mihalcin: #!/usr/bin/python

EDIT 2: It looks like this is not related to iPython. I removed iPython and I'm still running into this problem. Here are the contents of the file. (this is happening with most of my Python files)

#!/usr/bin/python

# Import libraries
import sys
import subprocess

def createCommand(project):
    # Create the basic command
    command = "git clone " + project

    subprocess.call(command, shell = True)

    return 0

def helpMenu():

    return 0;

def validateInput(user_input):
    # validity key
    valid = 0

    if (len(user_input) < 3):
        help()
        return 1

    if (user_input[1] == '-cl'):
        if (len(user_input) == 3):
            valid = 1
            return 0

    if (valid == 0):
        help()
        return 1

def main(user_input):
    # Validate inputs
    failure = validateInput(user_input)

    # Return if there was a failure    
    if (failure == 1):
        return 1;

    # Create the git commands        
    failure = createCommand(user_input[2])

    # Return if there was a failure    
    if (failure == 1):
        return 1;

    return 0;

if (__name__ == '__main__'):
    main(sys.argv)

EDIT 3: False Alarm!

This is embarrassing. It turns out I knew I was going to run into namespace issue with my help() function. I changed it to helpMenu() but forgot to change where it's called.

I'm so sorry for wasted post. :(

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1  
Could you post the first line (the shebang line) of script.py? –  Adam Mihalcin Apr 27 '12 at 22:28
    
Is there a reason you're not using the normal Python interpreter? –  Raceimaztion Apr 27 '12 at 22:52
    
Is /usr/bin/python not the normal interpreter? Or are you talking about the Python 2.7! This is the online help utility. part? If you're talking about the latter...I didn't intend to use this. –  Rico Apr 27 '12 at 23:01
    
To follow up. /usr/bin/python takes me to the standard Python 2.7.3 interpreter. –  Rico Apr 27 '12 at 23:02
    
perhaps #!/usr/bin/env python solves it –  bmu Apr 27 '12 at 23:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is embarrassing. It turns out I knew I was going to run into namespace issue with my help() function. I changed it to helpMenu() but forgot to change where it's called.

I'm so sorry for wasted post. :(

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