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When running my PHP script It keeps giving me the error

You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '1' at line 1

This is my sql code I have other than selecting from the table. I have commented out all of this and not gotten an error, so I'm assuming its occuring in this block of code.

    if($status === 1){
        $sqlQ = mysql_query("UPDATE tablename SET status=1 WHERE steam64='$id'");

        if(!mysql_query($sqlQ, $con)){
            die('Error: ' . mysql_error());
        }
    }else if($status !== 1){
        $sqlQ = mysql_query("UPDATE tablename SET status=2 WHERE steam64='$id'");

        if(!mysql_query($sqlQ, $con)){
            die('Error: ' . mysql_error());
        }
    }

What is really confusing me is the line 1 part.

share|improve this question
1  
Which datatype is the status column? If it's a non-int datatype, then you need to wrap 1 in quotes; '1'. –  Mike Purcell Apr 27 '12 at 22:38
2  
@MikePurcell Not an SQL syntax error though, is it? –  DaveRandom Apr 27 '12 at 22:39
    
@Archey It seems highly unlikely that this code is causing the problem, there are no syntax errors in your SQL. There are other problems that m'learned friends have (somewhat over-)enthusiastically pointed out, but an SQL syntax error is not one of them - apart from the fact that table is a reserved word. –  DaveRandom Apr 27 '12 at 22:41
1  
@DaveRandom: You are correct, it probably has something to do with variables he is passing into the mysql_query functions. The code as is looks legit. –  Mike Purcell Apr 27 '12 at 22:46
1  
@Archey: Change die('Error: ' . mysql_error()); to die('Error: ' . mysql_error() . ': ' . $sqlQ); so you can examine the resulting SQL statement. –  webbiedave Apr 27 '12 at 22:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're violating the DRY principle big time. Why not something like...

$statusValue = ($status === 1) ? 1 : 2;
$sqlQuery = mysql_query("UPDATE `14d2_group` SET `status` = $statusValue WHERE `steam64` = '$id'"):

UPDATE 2: It looks like there's a need for additional clarification.

mysql_query function doesn't only create a query: it actually sends in to MySQL - and returns the result. In case of UPDATE it will return FALSE if query has failed. That's why you shouldn't call mysql_query twice, as you did in the original example.

You can check how many lines were actually updated with mysql_affected_rows function.

UPDATE 3: Finally get it. ) That was the reason error appeared: you tried to call mysql_query with result of the last update query. Which was, as TRUE converted to String, just '1'. )

share|improve this answer
    
Turns out the unquoted identifier is not the cause of the error. From the MySql manual: Identifiers may begin with a digit but unless quoted may not consist solely of digits. –  webbiedave Apr 27 '12 at 22:50
    
Yes, but the syntax error he quoted is almost certainly caused by reserved words usage. Good point though. ) –  raina77ow Apr 27 '12 at 22:51
    
Table name isn't actually 'table' I changed it. I don't understand what exactly $statusValue is doing. I've also tried backticks. With your code SQL is just returning that the query is empty. –  Archey Apr 27 '12 at 22:58
    
You seem to either set status field to 1 or 2, depending on what status you receive from some other function. But that is the ONLY difference between two lengthy branches of code in your example. That's why it's better to separate this difference - and let common code be written just once, as it should be. –  raina77ow Apr 27 '12 at 23:17
    
I didn't understand your update 2, but I think you nailed it with your update 3. –  Simon André Forsberg Apr 27 '12 at 23:32

You're using the result from one query as a query itself.

What you probably wanted to do is:

if($status === 1){
    $sqlQ = mysql_query("UPDATE tablename SET status=1 WHERE steam64='$id'");

    if (!$sqlQ) {
        die('Error: ' . mysql_error());
    }
}
else {// no need for your if-statement here because it would always be true
    $sqlQ = mysql_query("UPDATE tablename SET status=2 WHERE steam64='$id'");

    if(!$sqlQ){
        die('Error: ' . mysql_error());
    }
}
share|improve this answer

"Line 1" corresponds to line 1 of the query, not the script invoking it. To add the line of the script invoking it, use:

die('Error: ' . mysql_error() . ' in ' . $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] . ' on line ' . __LINE__ );

As for the query, I don't really see anything jumping out at me. The only suggestion I have right now is to always enclose field names in backticks, just in case they're keywords (it also makes them clearer to read)

Also, your else if is redundant. If $status === 1 doesn't run, then clearly $status !== 1 must be true.

share|improve this answer
    
clearer to read? imho the backticks make the queries much less readable! –  ThiefMaster Apr 27 '12 at 22:40
    
Thanks for the swift reply :) I tried the die line you posted, oddly enough it says the error is on the line of which the die statement is executed. –  Archey Apr 27 '12 at 22:41
    
Yes, that's the best you can do (getting the line of the die()) - from that you can infer the line the query is on, since it should be the last one run before the given line. –  Niet the Dark Absol Apr 27 '12 at 22:43
    
@Archey That's the idea, the whole point is to make sure you have identified the correct statement. Have you changed the table name for posting here or do you really have a table called table? –  DaveRandom Apr 27 '12 at 22:44

Because of type casting, status=1 is not a problem. I'm assuming $id has some probrem. Once change $id to other safe value (1, 'foo'...) then check it works or not.

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1  
I had the thought that $id was the problem myself, then I saw this line: if(!mysql_query($sqlQ, $con)){ –  Simon André Forsberg Apr 27 '12 at 23:19
    
oh,,,,finally you find it! just simple lol thanks for comment –  tosin Apr 27 '12 at 23:24

The 'line 1' part is SQL saying that hte message it recieved had an error on line 1 -- the first line of the command that SQL tried to process.

If I had to make a guess, status isn't set to a number type, so you need to put quotes around it so that SQL knows it's being passed a variable.

Edit: OK, the other solution might be right too. We both made different assumptions about your data structure, and I think his is better. Try it first.

share|improve this answer
    
Not an SQL syntax error –  DaveRandom Apr 27 '12 at 22:36
    
Have you never heard of type casting? –  Niet the Dark Absol Apr 27 '12 at 22:37
    
DaveRandom, of course it's an SQL syntax error -- that's the message he posted. And Kolink, I have heard of type casting, but I'm not sure if it works in this case (personal experience is it hasn't, but that may have been because of another error in my command). –  RonLugge Apr 28 '12 at 3:03

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