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I always seem to fall behind the group in my class, and I wanted to "practice" for the next chapter in my class on Assembly, which is about loops.

I wrote this small loop to count from 1 to 10,000 (which I figured would take all of a millisecond to run):

    .MODEL SMALL

    .STACK 100h

    .DATA   
    Finished DB 10, 13, 'Loop x 10,000 finished.  Congratulations! $', 10, 13

    .CODE

    MAIN PROC

            MOV AX, @data            
            MOV DS, AX

            MOV CX, 10000            
            MOV BX, 0                

    StrtLoop:                        

            INC BX                   

    LOOP StrtLoop                    

            CMP BX, 10000                
            JE DispMsg               


            JMP SkipMsg              

    DispMsg:                         
            MOV AH, 09H             
            MOV DX, OFFSET Finished
            INT 21H
    SkipMsg:                         
            MOV AL, 0h               
            MOV AH, 4CH
            INT 21H

    MAIN ENDP
    END MAIN

I mistyped the number of zeroes a few minutes ago, and broke the program. I was wondering why this happened.

I got this error:

Assembling file: Loop.ASM

ERROR loop.ASM(15) Value out of range.

ERROR loop.ASM(24) Value out of range.

Error messages: 2

Warning messages: None

Passes:

Remaining memory: 467k

    .MODEL SMALL

    .STACK 100h

    .DATA   
    Finished DB 10, 13, 'Loop x 100000 finished.  Congratulations! $', 10, 13

    .CODE

    MAIN PROC

            MOV AX, @data            
            MOV DS, AX

            MOV CX, 100000               
            MOV BX, 0                

    StrtLoop:                        

            INC BX                   

    LOOP StrtLoop                    

            CMP BX, 100000               
            JE DispMsg               


            JMP SkipMsg              

    DispMsg:                         
            MOV AH, 09H             
            MOV DX, OFFSET Finished
            INT 21H
    SkipMsg:                         
            MOV AL, 0h               
            MOV AH, 4CH
            INT 21H

    MAIN ENDP
    END MAIN

After some Google searches (and fumbling around the book reading about memory registers), it turns out that there is a hard limit of 65,535 bytes. Is this correct? What if someone wanted to go beyond this memory limit? Is there a way to do it?

It just seems strange to me...

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3  
It sounds to me like you've discovered why people don't use 16-bit machines very often these days. –  Carl Norum Apr 27 '12 at 22:44
    
Indeed! Sadly, and for reasons unknown to me, this is what my school teaches for their CIS 215 course. –  SalarianEngineer Apr 29 '12 at 5:22

1 Answer 1

AX, BX, CX and DX are 16-bit registers. So you can't put a value bigger than 65,535 in them. If you want to loop more, use EAX, EBX, ECX or EDX, which are 32-bit registers.

Note that the ECX and CX are the preferred counting registers in x86. Think of the "C" as meaning "count". If you use the CX or ECX you can use the "LOOP" instruction which does the decrement compare (against zero), branch and jump all in one.

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1  
He's writing 16 bit code, so no EAX etc. –  Hans Passant Apr 27 '12 at 23:09
    
Using TASM means he is in virtual 8086 mode and does not have access to ECX or any other extended registers. –  Heath Hunnicutt Apr 27 '12 at 23:09
1  
@HeathHunnicutt: Not true. You can freely use 32-bit registers in real, virtual 8086 and 16-bit protected modes as long as your CPU is i80386 or better. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 27 '12 at 23:45
    
... and include .386 asmb directive or similar one, unless your assembler directly manage that instructions. –  Aacini Apr 28 '12 at 19:22
    
I asked yesterday, and my teacher says that we can't use extended registers in our class - then snidely (the guy is an arse) remarked that if I ever felt "the need" to count that high in his class, I would have to use labels instead of loops. He said if he sees extended registers (among other "rules"), then the assignment automatically gets a failing grade! I want to "prove" that I can do it (challenge accepted!). Since gen. registers can't go that high, What do you think would be best? Double-loop, counting with BX and CX? I wonder...'Loop' CX 1,000 times, nest BX 100 times, = 100,000? –  SalarianEngineer Apr 29 '12 at 0:07

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