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I am trying to construct two threads, thread A is the main thread and thread B is the second thread, thread B is updating a variable through a time consuming function (this variable should be shared between both threads, because eventually thread A needs to use that variable as well), but I want thread A to terminate thread B if thread B takes too long to complete (using an exception).

What I tried is the following:

Thread thread = new Thread() {
     public void run() {
         /// run something that could take a long time
     }
};

synchronized (thread) {
    thread.start();
}

System.err.println("Waiting for thread and terminating it if it did not stop.");
try {
   thread.wait(10000);
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
   System.err.println("interrupted.");
}

Should that give the expected behavior of terminating a behavior in case it has run more than 10 seconds? The thread object gets deleted after the wait, because the method that runs the thread returns.

Right now, what happens with this code is that I always get java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException on the wait(10000) command.

share|improve this question
    
Which thread ia A and B in your example? – Gray Apr 28 '12 at 0:10
    
You should not need to synchronized around matlabThread. Is there a reason you are doing that? – Gray Apr 28 '12 at 0:11
    
Where do you .run() the thread? I see a matlabThread thing, but I am not sure what that is. – Tony Ennis Apr 28 '12 at 0:11
    
I am sorry, matlabThread = thread, I changed the code here so it is more simplified. – kloop Apr 28 '12 at 0:13
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You will always get a IllegalMonitorStateException if you are calling wait() on an object that you are not synchronized on.

try {
    // you need this to do the wait
    synchronized (thread) {
       thread.wait(10000);
    }
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    System.err.println("interrupted.");
}

If you are waiting for the thread to finish then you probably are trying to do a:

try {
    thread.join(10000);
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    System.err.println("interrupted.");
}

Unfortunately, you do not know at that point if the thread is running because join doesn't return whether or not it timed out (grumble). So you need to test if the thread.isAlive() after the join.

If you are asking how you can cancel the thread if it runs for longer than 10000 millis, then the right thing to do is use thread.interrupt(). This will cause any sleep() or wait() methods to throw an InterruptedException and it will set the interrupt flag on the thread.

To use the interrupt flag your thread should be doing something like:

   while (!Thread.currentThread.isInterrupted()) {
       // do it's thread stuff
   }

Also, it is always a good pattern to do something like the following because once the InterruptedException is thrown, the interrupt flag has been cleared:

} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    // set the interrupt flag again because InterruptedException clears it
    Thread.currentThread.interrupt();
    System.err.println("interrupted.");
}
share|improve this answer
    
that's really bad. The code that I want to interrupt is actually executed externally. I am not sure if it possible to stop it. Thanks though, I have some directions now. – kloop Apr 28 '12 at 0:17
    
FYI: I've added some extra stuff to my answer @kloop. Best of luck. – Gray Apr 28 '12 at 0:19

That code is incorrect. Method wait is declared in Object class and is intended to suspend current thread using as monitor instance of the object on which it is called. You may invoke this method only in synchronized section, that is why you get your exception.

Regarding to your problem: in general you can not stop another thread if it does not want to stop. So you should invoke Thread.interrupt to notify the thread that it should stop working and it is up to that thread to decide to take into account that notification or not. To check if thread is interrupted you may use interrupted() or isInterrupted() methods.

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