Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

new to Java programming, I am just trying to understand how I can make this class be tested. I have made a Queue class:

public class Queue<E> {

private ArrayList<E> items;

public Queue(){
    items = new ArrayList<E>();
}

public void join(E e) {
    items.add(e);
}

public E leave() throws EmptyQueueError {
    if (items.isEmpty()) {
        throw new EmptyQueueError();
    }
    return items.remove(0);

}

}

I want to make a JUnit called QueueTest that is automatically reset to empty before each test that is commenced? Then I want it check that removing an item from an empty queue throws an EmptyQueueError? Finally, I want it to check that when several items join an (initially) empty queue, it is the first item that joined which is the first to leave?

It's a tutorial I am following but it fails to make me understand. I have made the class above and I have attempted the JTest class:

package queue;

public class QueueTest<e> {

private Queue q;

@Before
public void setUp() throws Exception {
}

@After
public void tearDown() throws Exception {
}

@Test
public void test() {
    q = new Queue<e>();
    assertEquals("Empty Queue", 0, q);

}

}

Am I close to what I am trying to achieve? I am trying to do the first one.

Thank you for your help and ample time.

share|improve this question
    
What problem are you experiencing? Does your test fail to compile or run? –  duffymo Apr 28 '12 at 1:07
    
Fails to run. Probably because I can't get it done. I logically do not understand. –  user1341994 Apr 28 '12 at 1:11
    
Does it compile? How do you try to run it? –  duffymo Apr 28 '12 at 1:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're doing well.

@Test
public void test() {
    q = new Queue<e>();
    assertEquals("Empty Queue", 0, q);

}

The problem with this is that you make a new Queue instance, but you don't do anything with it.

Then your test's innards could be

@Test
public void test() {
    Queue<Integer> q = new Queue<Integer>();      // A
    try {
        Integer ignore = q.leave();     // B
        fail("exception expected");               // C
    } catch (EmptyQueueError ex) {
        // implicit success                       // D
    }
}

What this means is that you'd make a Queue ('A'), then immediately try to get an item ('B'). This should cause an exception. If it does not, your test fails with "exception expected" ('C'). If the expected exception is thrown, you code works ('D')

I'll post more once you get this working.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes a lot of sense, thank you for commenting A, B, C and D. It clicked. Thank you again Tony, your time was appreciated. –  user1341994 Apr 29 '12 at 3:18

Try this: they run for me. You aren't far off.

    package cruft;

    import java.util.ArrayList;

    public class Queue<E> {

        private ArrayList<E> items;

        public Queue(){
            items = new ArrayList<E>();
        }

        public void join(E e) {
            items.add(e);
        }

        public E leave() throws EmptyQueueError {
            if (items.isEmpty()) {
                throw new EmptyQueueError();
            }
            return items.remove(0);

        }

        // Note: I added this.
        public int size() { return this.items.size(); }
    }
}

And here's the test:

package cruft;

import org.junit.Assert;
import org.junit.Test;

public class QueueTest {
    @Test
    public void test() {
        Queue<String> q = new Queue<String>();
        Assert.assertEquals("queue should be empty", 0, q.size());

    }
}

Notice: You should just create an instance in the test. Make sure your queue has a concrete type of thing to hold (String in this case).

Remember what generics are doing for you: they let you create a collection or container whose behavior doesn't depend on the type of objects it holds onto. So you might have a Queue that contains Strings or Persons or Penguins.

share|improve this answer
    
I think he wants to invoke leave() to generate the exception. –  Tony Ennis Apr 28 '12 at 1:30
    
I think he wants to learn how to test his class - all its methods. This is just an example. And, unless there's a class E in the classpath, he'll have a problem with your example. –  duffymo Apr 28 '12 at 1:34
    
His leave() returns an E. –  Tony Ennis Apr 28 '12 at 1:42
    
lol, back to the woodshed –  Tony Ennis Apr 28 '12 at 1:49
    
His leave returns the type that the Queue points to. If it's a Queue<String>, then leave returns a String. –  duffymo Apr 28 '12 at 2:13

So what are you trying to test here? When you do assertEquals("Empty Queue", 0, q) what are you attempting to test here? That the Queue is empty?

For the asserts what they usually take is something to test, IE Q == 0, and they take an optional message, which will be printed out if the test fails.

The flaw in why your assertEquals fails is something that you can see by investigating what the value of q is.

share|improve this answer

Here is how to do it with TestNG, showing how to test an exception and how to reset the queue before each test method:

public class QueueTest {

  private Queue q = new Queue();

  @BeforeMethod
  public void setUp() throws Exception {
      q.reset();
  }

  @Test(expectedExceptions = EmptyQueueError.class)
  public void shouldThrowIfRemovingFromEmpty() {
    assertTrue(q.isEmpty());
    q.remove(0);
  }

}

If you want to be very strict, you should probably test that each queue is initially empty and the exception in two separate test methods.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.