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Let's say we have this class A:

class A
{
public:
   int a;

   A(int b)
   {
      a = b;
   }
};

I would like to create a + overload such that I could use it like this

A a(1),b(2),c(3),&d;
d = a + b + c;

without modifying the content of each object. The next logical thing would be allocating a new chunk of memory each time like this:

A &operator+ (const A &b)
{
   A *c = new A(a+b.a);
   return *c;
}

But this would create a new problem: intermediate results are lost, causing memory leaks. I could have easily solved this problem by making a static function that takes three A object references and stores the sum of the first two in the third, but I'm willing to bet that there must be some way to make + overload happen the way I want.

So the question is: is there any way I could use a chain of operator overloads that do not modify the operands without causing memory leaks?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can simply use pass by value and do this:

A operator+ (A other) //pass by value
{
   other.a += a;
   return other;
}

Or, since the member a is publicly accessible, you can (rather should) make operator+ a non-member function as:

A operator+(A left, A const &right) 
{
   left.a += right.a;
   return left;
}

Notice that the first argument is accepted by value, and second by reference. In this way, you don't need to declare a local variable in the function. You can use the first parameter; after all it is local to the function, you can do whatever you want to do with it: in this case, we just add right.a to it, and return it.


A better design of class would be this: (read the comments)

class A
{
   int a;  //make it private
public:    
   A(int b) : a(b) //use member initialization list
   {
   }
   A& operator+=(A const & other)  //add `+=` overload, as member of the class
   {
      a += other.a;
      return *this;
   }
};

//and make `+` non-member and non-friend 
A operator+(A left, A const & right) 
{
  left += right; //compute this in terms of `+=` which is a member function
  return left;
}
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1  
+1 for avoiding the manual copy. –  Sven Apr 28 '12 at 3:19
    
sorry but your answer seems to have ignored the fact that I was specifically asking about a way not to modify any of the operand objects –  Kenny Apr 28 '12 at 3:21
    
@user803253: I don't modify the operands; the operands are passed as value, which means what you modify in the function are copies of the operands. Anyway, I posted a better design which you should adopt. –  Nawaz Apr 28 '12 at 3:25
2  
@user803253: The operands are not modified, the parameters in the function are, but those are copies of the original operands that remain unchanged. Regarding the arguments, it is better to use the free function approach and pass the first argument by value, as the sum is left associative, so a+b+c+d is ((a+b)+c)+d which means that the temporaries that can be optimized by passing by value are used as the left hand side operand to the next operation in the chain. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 28 '12 at 3:28
1  
I see thank you everyone for your input –  Kenny Apr 28 '12 at 3:46

There is no need to use pointers inside operator+. You can allocate the intermediate object in the stack and then return it:

A operator+ (const A &b)
{
   A c(a+b.a);
   return c;
}

Or just:

A operator+ (const A &b)
{
   return A(a+b.a);
}

Or even simpler:

A operator+ (const A &b)
{
   return a+b.a;
}

Since this implicitly calls A::A(int).

Note that I removed the reference from the return type. You can't return a non-const reference to a local.

Then you would use it this way:

A a(1),b(2),c(3),d;
d = a + b + c;

Note that d is no longer a reference.

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Alert: You are returning references to temporaries. That's not a good idea! –  Tilman Vogel Apr 28 '12 at 3:15
    
works great! thanks. I knew something simple needed to be done. –  Kenny Apr 28 '12 at 3:17
    
As soon as I posted my answer, I noticed that OP was returning references, but fixed my answer right away. –  mfontanini Apr 28 '12 at 3:17

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