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I have a property that I'll call index. I have a mutable array that I'll call array. I'm shocked to find this code throws an index out of bounds exception?

if(index >= [array count]) return;


for(self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index]; index < [array count]; self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index]) {
        index++;
        //do stuffs
    }

However, this variant works:

if(index >= [array count]) return;
while(index < [array count];) {
    self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index];
    index++;
    //do stuffs
}

I expect for loops to operate like so:

for(initialization instructions; condition; next iteration instruction) {...}

I expect the following sequence:

  1. The initialization instructions are executed
  2. Execute code in for loop
  3. Break if condition returns false/0. otherwise, execute next iteration instruction. Then go to 2.

This tells me the for loops do not necessarily check the condition prior to executing the next iteration code (as is in C/C++). So, I'm curious whether there are multiple schools of thought on the order of operations of the for loop. If not, this tells me I have more complicated issues to address.

Thanks.

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2  
How do you increment index in the first case? –  Costique Apr 28 '12 at 5:02
    
I'm sorry if I'm rambling... I made a lot of assumptions about your code that I shouldn't have. –  CodaFi Apr 28 '12 at 5:27
    
it never happened... –  stephen Apr 28 '12 at 5:31
    
@Costique I've implemented a first/next iterator because not all items can be considered in one batch. Index is initialized to 0 in first. First calls next after doing so. The code you see is the framework for next. This ensures a valid index prior to calling objectAtIndex. –  stephen Apr 28 '12 at 5:39
    
I'm too tired to trace through the details of the for loop correctly right now, but your expected sequence is definitely incorrect. The condition is tested before the code in the loop is run, in Objective-C or in C. Note, also, that Objective-C's for loop IS C's for loop. They'll perform identically. Your assumptions are wrong here somehow. –  Steven Fisher Apr 28 '12 at 6:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Are you incrementing index within the for loop in the first case?

for(self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index]; index < [array count]; self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index]) { 
    //do stuffs 
    index++;
} 

If this is the case then your syntax is messed up in the third section of your for loop where you set self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index] and that is exactly where the exception is being thrown because this part gets executed before the comparison of index < [array count] takes place and breaks you out of the loop.

Why don't you just have your for loop defined as this?

for(self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index]; index < [array count]; index++) { 
        //do stuffs 
    } 

The first time through you will get the CONDITION checked first, but then the incrementer is running at the end of each iteration of the loop. At that point it goes INCREMENTER -> CONDITION -> loop_body.

It's the equivalent of the following:

initialize; 
while(condition) { 
    // do stuffs
    index++;
    LOOP_INCREMENTER; // this is your assignment statement, self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index]; 
} 
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I still think the OP wanted a for-in loop. –  CodaFi Apr 28 '12 at 5:09
    
Thanks for the feedback. I forgot a line of code. I updated. In my case I'm implementing an iterator to iterate through several key paths that aren't necessarily considered in the same batch. My iterations are setup in a first, next pattern. The index is initialized to 0 in the first method, and then calls next. –  stephen Apr 28 '12 at 5:21
    
@nvuono I was curious about that. I did try for(self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index]; index < [array count]; self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index], index++) I saw the same effect. –  stephen Apr 28 '12 at 5:46
    
But, I hope you are wrong. I, among many others, are under the impression that the condition is always checked before the third part can execute. And this is exactly my question! Did obj-c really redefine the order of operations here?@!? –  stephen Apr 28 '12 at 5:53
    
@nvuono I was finally able to dig up several websites that assure me that the condition is always checked before executing the body of the for loop in obj-c. And only after this, can the 'third statement' execute. In any case, either the objective-C high jack rewrote the order of operations, or the compiler decided that the the condition wasn't necessary in my case due to optimization. –  stephen Apr 28 '12 at 6:17

Your expectation for how for loops work isn't correct.

for(initialization instructions; condition; next iteration instruction) {...}

The sequence is the following:

1. initialization instructions
2. test condition, if condition is true do the following:
    2a. execute loop body
    2b. execute next iteration instruction
    2c. goto step 2

So the problem is that when index == ([array count] - 1), the loop body executes which evaluates index++, setting index == [array count].

When the loop body finishes, the "next iteration instruction" will attempt to evaluate [array objectAtIndex:index] with index being too large by one. Remember that this step happens after the loop body is executed and before the condition is tested. That is the way C has always handled for loops.

Try the following loop instead:

for(; index < [array count]; ++index) {
    self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index];

    //do stuffs
}

Of course, you may also need to adjust any existing use of index that's in the //do stuffs area of the loop body.

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The code you wrote does not what you expect.

To iterate through an array, you should consider the for-in loop:

for (MyObject* obj in array) {
   // do something with obj
   self.item = obj;
}

The for-loop you are using is wrong in several manners and it is (quite) obvious why you exceed the limits of the array:

In the last valid cycle you are increasing the index, then the for-instruction will execute the third argument of for:

self.item = [array objectAtIndex:index]

In that very moment, index is larger than the array bounds, since the condition (second argument of the for-instruction) will be executed afterwards.

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