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I need to store couple of thousand text/number combinations in a database on iPhone and on Android. While creating a database on either device is no issue - I would like to know how "confidential" can one actually make the data in such databases?

What I would like to avoid is that anyone "cracks" the complete database with all the entries.

While I don't care if one can get to some entries by any means.

It just should be as difficult as possible to extract all the data from the database.

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user387184,

For the most crucial data on iOS I'd personally recommend using Keychain APIs (which can be found in the Security framework. Keychain is an encrypted storage which can be used for storing accounts, passwords, sensitive data.

However if you wish to encrypt the whole database you should take a look at the Apple's Data Protection API which allow you to easily encrypt whole database using NSFileProtectionComplete flag.

As for the Android I am not sure if there's a publicly available API for such operations. You could take a look at Android Encryption, however it is available for Android devices with Android 3.0 and higher.

An alternative approach for Android could be using a storage encrypted using simple PIN code and prompting user to input the key on each subsequent launch of the app (however from user experience point of view that wouldn't be a good solution).

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Keychain services and Apple's built-in data protection apis have been shown to be easily cracked. Do not use them for highly sensitive data. Encrypt your database manually. –  Jack Lawrence Apr 28 '12 at 8:22
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The only thing I can suggest is to encrypt every database entry with your own encription method. –  Maxim Mikheev Apr 28 '12 at 9:55
    
@JackLawrence there's no security/encryption that cannot be breached. However as far as I am concern cracking Data Protection API is quite tricky to crack and there's only one company (Russian-based afair) that markets such feature. Unless I'm wrong - if so please post sources, I'd love to learn more. –  Pawel Apr 28 '12 at 15:58
    
And one more update: here's the blog post on breaking iOS Data Protection API: eweek.com/c/a/Security/… As said before, only one company was able to beach and they considered it to be "adequate against even the best equipped adversaries, including forensic analysts and law enforcement agencies". I'm pretty sure that you're ok for even enterprise-level implementations. –  Pawel Apr 28 '12 at 16:04

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