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I have sql query where i like to get total records.

I have one employer and 600 jobs by this employer.

I need to get all the employers but for some reason my query is returning total jobs which employer posted.

Please let me know what i'm going wrong in this query.

SELECT count(c.id) as total 
FROM employer as c INNER JOIN  job as j ON j.employerIDFK = c.id 
WHERE c.isActive=1 AND c.status=1 
AND j.isActive=1 
AND j.beenActive=1 
AND j.status=1 
AND DATE_ADD( j.createdAt, INTERVAL 30 DAY ) > NOW()
share|improve this question
1  
A few things jump out at me about this query. 1) Use proper joins. Implicit joins cause tons of problems (I suspect it's involved in this actually). 2) Precalculate NOW() - 30 days and then use that value to compare with j.createdAt. That way, you can avoid a full table scan (if j.createdAt is indexed). –  Corbin Apr 28 '12 at 10:16
    
I need to get full list of jobs which are still less then 30 days. I dont know what you mean by Precalculate NOW()? –  Lalajee Apr 28 '12 at 10:18
    
Since the value of NOW() is constantly changing, MySQL must compare recalculate it for each and every row. This means that even without the DATE_ADD, a full table scan would be required. Basically, you have this: a + b < c. However, a can be indexed, meaning if you can get a comparison involving just a and not a function of a, you can exploit this index. In other words, you want to change it into a < c - b. However, c is constantly changing, so you still must do a complete table scan (indexes can only work with constants). –  Corbin Apr 28 '12 at 10:21
    
So, what is the short version of what I'm saying? Calculate now() - 30 days in PHP. Basically j.createdAt < $date with $date = date('Y-m-d H:i:s', strtotime('now -30 days)); –  Corbin Apr 28 '12 at 10:22
1  
@Corbin: the value of NOW() never changes during the query (or a trigger, or a stored procedure). It's SYSDATE() which changes. Predicates involving NOW() may be sargable (the one in the original query is not of course, but not because of NOW()). –  Quassnoi Apr 28 '12 at 10:41
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT  COUNT(DISTINCT c.id) AS total 
FROM    employer c
JOIN    job j
ON      j.employerIDFK = c.id
WHERE   c.isActive = 1
        AND c.status = 1
        AND j.isActive = 1 
        AND j.beenActive = 1 
        AND j.status = 1 
        AND j.createdAt >= NOW() - INTERVAL 30 DAY

Create the following indexes:

employer (isActive, status)
job (employerFKID)
job (isActive, beenActive, status, createdAt, employerFKID)

for the query to work faster.

If for some obscure reasons you are reluctant to use DISTINCT, you may use this:

SELECT  COUNT(c.id) AS total
FROM    employer c
WHERE   c.isActive = 1
        AND c.status = 1
        AND c.id IN
        (
        SELECT  employerIDFK
        FROM    job j
        WHERE   j.isActive = 1
                AND j.beenActive = 1
                AND j.status = 1
                AND j.createdAt >= NOW() - INTERVAL 30 DAY
        )

, however, this may be less efficient, as MySQL cannot make job leading in this kind of query.

share|improve this answer
    
This does work. I'm only getting 1 record now which is correct. but can this be done without DISTINCT –  Lalajee Apr 28 '12 at 11:34
1  
@Lalajee: what do you have against DISTINCT? –  Quassnoi Apr 28 '12 at 11:35
    
in past been told to avoid this. –  Lalajee Apr 28 '12 at 11:36
1  
@Lalajee: I hereby absolve you from this limitation. DISTINCT is fine to use (at least in this query). –  Quassnoi Apr 28 '12 at 11:39
    
thank you. you have no idea what you have done for me. i was trying to fix this for week now i was not able to see why my query was return wrong answer. Thank you so much. –  Lalajee Apr 28 '12 at 11:40
show 5 more comments

Your query should be returning a count for all jobs for all employers, but there are some criteria that they must match to show up. An implicit join, as you are using, is an INNER JOIN. This requires all criteria to match in order for the rows to be included. This means it only returns jobs that are "isActive", "beenActive", "status=1", and createdAt is less than 30 days in the past, where employeres are "isActive" and "status=1". Check your data to see if this is what you want.

SELECT c.id AS employerID, count(*) as total 
FROM employer as c, job as j 
WHERE c.isActive=1 AND c.status=1 
AND j.employerIDFK = c.id 
AND j.isActive=1 
AND j.beenActive=1 
AND j.status=1 
AND DATE_ADD( j.createdAt, INTERVAL 30 DAY ) > NOW()
GROUP BY c.id

As far as what others are trying to say regarding the filter on the createdAt, MySQL will first evaluate NOW() (just once). It then adds 30 days to each createdAt date to see if it's greater than NOW(). MySQL will sometimes automatically optimize this, and it depends on your version and some other factors, but in general, performing a function against the createdAt date for each row to compare it to a constant expression is bad because MySQL can't utilize an index on the createdAt column.

So, you should convert:

AND DATE_ADD( j.createdAt, INTERVAL 30 DAY ) > NOW()

To this:

AND j.createdAt > DATE_ADD( NOW(), INTERVAL -30 DAY )

This leaves j.createdAt column as a plain column, so MySQL can now utilize any index against the column to find dates that are less than 30 days in the past.

It's the equivalent of standing in a room with 100 people and asking them to add 30 days to their birthday, then asking who's calculated date is greater than today. You just made 100 people do work. Instead, precalculate the criteria by subtracting 30 days from today's date and simply ask if anyone's birthday is greater than that date. You only had to do one calculation, and it saved those 100 people from having to do the hard work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for fix for my date value. Sorry my problem is that I need to return numbers on employers which have posted job and they jobs are less then 30 days. But I keep getting 604 records where I should only get 1 record as I only have 1 employer in my employer table. –  Lalajee Apr 28 '12 at 11:04
    
i do have 604 jobs which are posted by this employer. –  Lalajee Apr 28 '12 at 11:06
    
@Lalajee, I updated my answer to provide an analogy. Where'd your GROUP clause go? –  Ami Apr 28 '12 at 11:06
    
Even with Group i'm still getting 604 records –  Lalajee Apr 28 '12 at 11:09
    
I try almost every thing but still i get same results. I think my query is missing something. –  Lalajee Apr 28 '12 at 11:10
show 13 more comments

I suspect "SELECT count(*) as total" is your problem. You are asking SQL to count everything that is returned. Watch out for what you are "SELECT"-ing since that's the only thing which will be returned to you.

You didn't quite explain what you're trying to achieve here. "I need to get all the employers" is vague and hard to understand. What data are you trying to get about the employers? Their ID? Their total jobs?

share|improve this answer
    
this is just the total records for my Pagination. I need to ask system to return total numbers of employers which have post jobs on site. –  Lalajee Apr 28 '12 at 10:22
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