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I understand what livelock is but I was wondering if anyone had a good code-based example of it? And by code-based, I do NOT mean "two people trying to get past each other in a corridor". If I read that again, I'll lose my lunch.

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42  
How about a software simulation of two people trying to get past each other in a corridor? –  1800 INFORMATION Jun 24 '09 at 5:06
18  
Curse you! I lost my lunch! –  Alex Miller Jun 24 '09 at 21:14
1  
Strangely appropriate: seuss.wikia.com/wiki/The_Zax –  Chris Lively May 15 '13 at 15:37
    
Related joke for curious fellas: codingarchitect.wordpress.com/2006/01/18/… –  Veehmot May 18 '13 at 7:59
    
Two threads waiting for the other thread to notify is also a Live lock isnt it ? –  Sudhakar Apr 13 at 4:51

6 Answers 6

Here's a very simple Java example of livelock where a husband and wife are trying to eat soup, but only have one spoon between them. Each spouse is too polite, and will pass the spoon if the other has not yet eaten.

public class Livelock 
{
    static class Spoon
    {
        private Diner owner;
        public Spoon(Diner d) { owner = d; }
        public Diner getOwner() { return owner; }
        public synchronized void setOwner(Diner d) { owner = d; }
        public synchronized void use() { System.out.printf("%s has eaten!", owner.name); }
    }

    static class Diner
    {
        private String name;
        private boolean isHungry;

        public Diner(String n) { name = n; isHungry = true; }       
        public String getName() { return name; }
        public boolean isHungry() { return isHungry; }

        public void eatWith(Spoon spoon, Diner spouse) 
        {
            while (isHungry)
            {
                // Don't have the spoon, so wait patiently for spouse.
                if (spoon.owner != this)
                {
                    try { Thread.sleep(1); } catch(InterruptedException e) { continue; }
                    continue;
                }                       

                // If spouse is hungry, insist upon passing the spoon.
                if (spouse.isHungry()) 
                {                   
                    System.out.printf("%s: You eat first my darling %s!%n", name, spouse.getName());
                    spoon.setOwner(spouse);
                    continue;
                }

                // Spouse wasn't hungry, so finally eat
                spoon.use();
                isHungry = false;               
                System.out.printf("%s: I am stuffed, my darling %s!%n", name, spouse.getName());                
                spoon.setOwner(spouse);
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        final Diner husband = new Diner("Bob");
        final Diner wife = new Diner("Alice");

        final Spoon s = new Spoon(husband);

        new Thread(new Runnable() { public void run() { husband.eatWith(s, wife); } }).start();
        new Thread(new Runnable() { public void run() { wife.eatWith(s, husband); } }).start();
    }
}
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1  
Thanks for the illustrative example! –  will824 Feb 11 '13 at 15:49
    
Ditto... +1 clever. –  Eddie B Aug 7 at 1:13

Flippant comments aside, one example which is known to come up is in code which tries to detect and handle deadlock situations. If two threads detect a deadlock, and try to "step aside" for each other, without care they will end up being stuck in a loop always "stepping aside" and never managing to move forwards.

By "step aside" I mean that they would release the lock and attempt to let the other one acquire it. We might imagine the situation with two threads doing this (pseudocode):

// thread 1
getLocks12(lock1, lock2)
{
  lock1.lock();
  while (lock2.locked())
  {
    // attempt to step aside for the other thread
    lock1.unlock();
    wait();
    lock1.lock();
  }
  lock2.lock();
}

// thread 2
getLocks21(lock1, lock2)
{
  lock2.lock();
  while (lock1.locked())
  {
    // attempt to step aside for the other thread
    lock2.unlock();
    wait();
    lock2.lock();
  }
  lock1.lock();
}

Race conditions aside, what we have here is a situation where both threads, if they enter at the same time will end up running in the inner loop without proceeding. Obviously this is a simplified example. A naiive fix would be to put some kind of randomness in the amount of time the threads would wait.

The proper fix is to always respect the lock heirarchy. Pick an order in which you acquire the locks and stick to that. For example if both threads always acquire lock1 before lock2, then there is no possibility of deadlock.

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Yeah, I understand that. I'm looking for an actual code example of such. The question is what does "step aside" mean and how does it produce such a scenario. –  Alex Miller Jun 25 '09 at 13:14
    
+1 for nice explanation! –  Aditya Feb 13 at 8:49
    
I get that this is a contrived example but is it likely that this could lead to a livelock? Wouldn't it be much more likely that eventually a window would open where one function could grab both, due to inconsistencies in the time the threads are aloud to run and when they are scheduled. –  DubiousPusher Apr 17 at 16:23
    
Although it isn't a stable livelock because they will obviously break out of it eventually, I think it fits the description well enough –  1800 INFORMATION Apr 17 at 19:35

A real (albeit without exact code) example is two competing processes live locking in an attempt to correct for a SQL server deadlock, with each process using the same wait-retry algorithm for retrying. While it's the luck of timing, I have seen this happen on separate machines with similar performance characteristics in response to a message added to an EMS topic (e.g. saving an update of a single object graph more than once), and not being able to control the lock order.

A good solution in this case would be to have competing consumers (prevent duplicate processing as high up in the chain as possible by partitioning the work on unrelated objects).

A less desirable (ok, dirty-hack) solution is to break the timing bad luck (kind of force differences in processing) in advance or break it after deadlock by using different algorithms or some element of randomness. This could still have issues because its possible the lock taking order is "sticky" for each process, and this takes a certain minimum of time not accounted for in the wait-retry.

Yet another solution (at least for SQL Server) is to try a different isolation level (e.g. snapshot).

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One example here might be using a timed tryLock to obtain more than one lock and if you can't obtain them all, back off and try again.

boolean tryLockAll(Collection<Lock> locks) {
  boolean grabbedAllLocks = false;
  for(int i=0; i<locks.size(); i++) {
    Lock lock = locks.get(i);
    if(!lock.tryLock(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS)) {
      grabbedAllLocks = false;

      // undo the locks I already took in reverse order
      for(int j=i-1; j >= 0; j--) {
        lock.unlock();
      }
    }
  }
}

I could imagine such code would be problematic as you have lots of threads colliding and waiting to obtain a set of locks. But I'm not sure this is very compelling to me as a simple example.

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for this to be a livelock you'll need another thread to acquire those locks in a different order. If all the threads use tryLockAll() with the locks in locks in the same order, there is no livelock. –  JaviMerino Jul 19 at 8:18

Python version of jelbourn's code:

import threading
import time
lock = threading.Lock()

class Spoon:
    def __init__(self, diner):
        self.owner = diner

    def setOwner(self, diner):
        with lock:
            self.owner = diner

    def use(self):
        with lock:
            "{0} has eaten".format(self.owner)

class Diner:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
        self.hungry = True

    def eatsWith(self, spoon, spouse):
        while(self.hungry):
            if self != spoon.owner:
                time.sleep(1) # blocks thread, not process
                continue

            if spouse.hungry:
                print "{0}: you eat first, {1}".format(self.name, spouse.name)
                spoon.setOwner(spouse)
                continue

            # Spouse was not hungry, eat
            spoon.use()
            print "{0}: I'm stuffed, {1}".format(self.name, spouse.name)
            spoon.setOwner(spouse)

def main():
    husband = Diner("Bob")
    wife = Diner("Alice")
    spoon = Spoon(husband)

    t0 = threading.Thread(target=husband.eatsWith, args=(spoon, wife))
    t1 = threading.Thread(target=wife.eatsWith, args=(spoon, husband))
    t0.start()
    t1.start()
    t0.join()
    t1.join()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
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I coded up the example of 2 persons passing in a corridor. The two threads will avoid each other as soon as they realise their directions are the same.

public class LiveLock {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Object left = new Object();
        Object right = new Object();
        Pedestrian one = new Pedestrian(left, right, 0); //one's left is one's left
        Pedestrian two = new Pedestrian(right, left, 1); //one's left is two's right, so have to swap order
        one.setOther(two);
        two.setOther(one);
        one.start();
        two.start();
    }
}

class Pedestrian extends Thread {
    private Object l;
    private Object r;
    private Pedestrian other;
    private Object current;

    Pedestrian (Object left, Object right, int firstDirection) {
        l = left;
        r = right;
        if (firstDirection==0) {
            current = l;
        }
        else {
            current = r;
        }
    }

    void setOther(Pedestrian otherP) {
        other = otherP;
    }

    Object getDirection() {
        return current;
    }

    Object getOppositeDirection() {
        if (current.equals(l)) {
            return r;
        }
        else {
            return l;
        }
    }

    void switchDirection() throws InterruptedException {
        Thread.sleep(100);
        current = getOppositeDirection();
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " is stepping aside.");
    }

    public void run() {
        while (getDirection().equals(other.getDirection())) {
            try {
                switchDirection();
                Thread.sleep(100);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
        }
    }
} 
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