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I'm trying to make "primes" a list of prime numbers, but somehow I can't. It throws me an "Ambiguous type variable `a0'" error and I don't know what to do with it...

candidates :: [Integer]
candidates = [2]++[3,5..]

primes :: [Integer]
primes = filter is_prime candidates

is_prime :: Integer -> Bool
is_prime candidate
    | candidate == 1 = False
    | candidate == 2 = True
    | candidate == 3 = True
    | otherwise = r_is_prime candidate 0

-- r as recursive
r_is_prime :: Integer -> Integer -> Bool
r_is_prime candidate order
    | n_th_prime >= max_compared_prime = True
    | candidate `mod` n_th_prime  == 0 = False
    | otherwise = if (r_is_prime candidate (order+1) ) then True else False
    where 
        n_th_prime = candidates !! fromIntegral(order)
        -- this is the line that throws an error...
        max_compared_prime = fromIntegral ( ceiling ( fromIntegral ( sqrt ( fromIntegral candidate))))

Could you please give me a hand?

Thank you!

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primes = 2 : 3 : [n | n<-[5,7..], foldr (\p r-> p*p>n || (rem n p /= 0 && r)) True (tail primes)] –  Will Ness Apr 28 '12 at 14:26
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In

max_compared_prime = fromIntegral ( ceiling ( fromIntegral ( sqrt ( fromIntegral candidate))))

you have a fromIntegral too much. sqrt has type

sqrt :: Floating a => a -> a

so the result of sqrt is not a member of an Integral type. And the result of ceiling is an Integral type, so the last fromIntegral is superfluous (but does not harm).

max_compared_prime = ceiling ( sqrt ( fromIntegral candidate))

is all you need in that line.

Note, however, that

n_th_prime = candidates !! fromIntegral(order)

means that to test against the n-th candidate prime, the list of candidates has to be traversed until the n-th prime has been reached. Thus testing against the n-th candidate is O(n) here instead of O(1) [Well, assuming that numbers are bounded] which a single division is.

A more efficient trial division only tries primes for the division and remembers where in the list of primes it was when it goes on to the next prime. For example

is_prime :: Integer -> Bool
is_prime n
    | n < 2     = False
    | n < 4     = True
    | otherwise = trialDivision primes
      where
        r = floor (sqrt $ fromIntegral n)
        trialDivision (p:ps)
            | r < p     = True
            | otherwise = n `rem` p /= 0 && trialDivision ps

Just traverses the list of primes in order to do the trial division, hence going from one prime to the next is a simple step in the list.

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how can I test against n-th prime in O(1) ? –  Novellizator Apr 28 '12 at 13:50
    
By remembering where you were in the list of primes. I'll edit a more efficient implementation of is_prime in. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 28 '12 at 13:51
    
I don't know where is the problem but your version of is_prime doesn't return any answer... (tried "primes !! 5" and it didn't return anything....) –  Novellizator Apr 28 '12 at 14:51
    
Ah, because ceiling (sqrt 5) is 3. Fixed now, floor instead of ceiling. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 28 '12 at 14:58
    
sorry mate, still doesn't work... –  Novellizator Apr 28 '12 at 16:21
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You have too many fromIntegrals in

max_compared_prime = fromIntegral ( ceiling ( fromIntegral ( sqrt ( fromIntegral candidate))))

The fromIntegral applied to the result of sqrt is causing the error. If we look at the type signatures, we have:

fromIntegral :: (Num b, Integral a) => a -> b
sqrt :: Floating a => a -> a

So to properly infer the type of fromIntegral (sqrt x) Haskell needs to find a type with both Floating and Integral instances (so that the result of sqrt matches the parameter of fromIntegral). Haskell can't find such a type and so (basically) is asking you to specify one (but there isn't one). The solution is to just elide this fromIntegral:

max_compared_prime = fromIntegral ( ceiling ( sqrt ( fromIntegral candidate)))

other notes

Brackets aren't particularly idiomatic Haskell, so that line can/should be written as:

max_compared_prime = fromIntegral . ceiling . sqrt . fromIntegral $ candidate

Furthermore, the result of ceiling doesn't need to be converted, so it can even be:

max_compared_prime = ceiling . sqrt . fromIntegral $ candidate
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Remove 'fromIntegral' from before 'sqrt', as:

max_compared_prime = fromIntegral ( ceiling ( sqrt ( fromIntegral candidate)))

The types are:

sqrt :: Floating a => a -> a
fromIntegral :: (Integral a, Num b) => a -> b

the output of sqrt is 'Floating', not Integral.

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