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I want to compute rank of element in an IEnumerable list and assign it to the member. But below code works only when called 1st time. 2nd time call starts from last rank value. So instead of output 012 and 012, I'm getting 012 and 345

    class MyClass
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int Rank { get; set; }
    }

    public void SecondTimeRankEvaluvate()
    {
        MyClass[] myArray = new MyClass[] 
        {
            new MyClass() { Name = "Foo" },
            new MyClass() { Name = "Bar" },
            new MyClass() { Name = "Baz" }
        };

        int r = 0;
        var first = myArray.Select(s => { s.Rank = r++; return s; });

        foreach (var item in first)
        {
            Console.Write(item.Rank);
        }
        // Prints 012
        Console.WriteLine("");
        foreach (var item in first)
        {
            Console.Write(item.Rank);
        }
        // Prints 345
    }

I understand that the variable r is being captured (closure) and reused when called 2nd time. I don't want that behavior. Is there any clean way to compute rank and assign it? Also r variable (in actual code) isn't in the same scope where foreach loop is present. It is in a function which returns var first

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
var first = myArray.Select((s, i) => { s.Rank = i; return s; });
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1  
+1, but you should still return s, no? –  Cameron Apr 28 '12 at 13:52
    
+1, thanks for your note –  Mostafa Tofigh Apr 28 '12 at 13:56
    
yup this worked! thanks. Where is i coming from? –  Ankush Apr 28 '12 at 13:57
    
It's an overload of Select. –  Mostafa Tofigh Apr 28 '12 at 13:58

LINQ uses lazy evaluation and runs the Select part every time you use myArray.

You can force evaluation to happen only once by storing the result in a List.

Change

var first = myArray.Select(s => { s.Rank = r++; return s; });

to

var first = myArray.Select(s => { s.Rank = r++; return s; }).ToList();

Another way would be to join myArray with a new sequence using Zip every time, like this

var first = myArray.Zip(Enumerable.Range(0, int.MaxValue), (s, r) =>
{
    s.Rank = r;
    return s;
});
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Thanks. Yeah this will work. But is there any clean way to have deferred execution and ranking generated on the fly, instead of converting whole thing to list. –  Ankush Apr 28 '12 at 13:52

You shouldn't use LINQ if you're not querying the collection.

To update each item in an array, use a for loop:

for (int i = 0; i < myArray.Length; i++)
{
    myArray[i].Rank = i;
}

To update each item in an enumerable, use a foreach loop:

int r = 0;
foreach (var item in myArray)
{
    item.Rank = r++;
}
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