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#ifndef UNICODE
#define UNICODE
#endif

#include <Windows.h>
#include <cstdio>

TCHAR* getSystemVolumine()
{
    TCHAR volumine[2];
    TCHAR buffer[30];

    GetSystemWindowsDirectory(buffer,30);

    for(int i=0 ; i < 2 ; i++)
        volumine[i]=buffer[i];

    return volumine;
}


int main()
{
    wprintf(L"Your system volumine letter%s\n",getSystemVolumine());
    system("pause");
}

I don't have any idea what can be wrong with this code. Debugging showed neither errors nor warnings, but the output is:

Your system volumine letter
Press any key to continue...
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are returning a pointer to a local variable, when the function has returned, that variable no longer exsits A string for wprintf has to end with '\0'.

#include <Windows.h>
#include <cstdio>

void getSystemVolumine(TCHAR *vol)
{
    TCHAR buffer[30];

    GetSystemWindowsDirectory(buffer,30);

    for(int i=0 ; i < 2 ; i++)
        vol[i]=buffer[i];

    vol[2] = 0;
}


int main()
{
    TCHAR vol[3];

    getSystemVolumine(vol);

    wprintf(L"Your system volumine letter %S\n",vol);
    system("pause");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think that making volumine variable static is much simplier solution :) –  0x6B6F77616C74 Apr 28 '12 at 14:27
    
Just a FWIW: It's generally recommended to avoid using statics so that you don't run into issues if the code is made multi-threaded later; it's considered cleaner to have the caller provide the buffer (above), or have the function return a new buffer. Even in single-threaded code, you can have problems if some piece of code saves away the pointer, and a later call changes the value in the buffer. In this specific case, however, since the system directory is constant, and won't change for the lifetime of the process (and is the same for all threads), static is fine and safe here. –  BrendanMcK Apr 30 '12 at 17:30

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