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I can search a CJK char (such as ) by using a unicode code point:

/\%u5c0f
/[\u5c0f]

I cannot search all of CJK chars by using [\u4E00-\u9FFF], because vim manual says:

:help /[]
NOTE: The other backslash codes mentioned above do not work inside []!

Is these a way to do the job?

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If you only search for specific CJK chars, you can just type in the CJK in search. For example: /小 –  David.Chu.ca Apr 28 '12 at 14:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Vim cannot actually do this by itself, since you aren’t given access to Unicode properties like \p{Han}.

As of Unicode v6.0, the range of codepoints for characters in the Han script is:

2E80-2E99 2E9B-2EF3 2F00-2FD5 3005-3005 3007-3007 3021-3029 3038-303B 3400-4DB5 4E00-9FCB F900-FA2D FA30-FA6D FA70-FAD9 20000-2A6D6 2A700-2B734 2B740-2B81D 2F800-2FA1D 

Whereas with Unicode v6.1, the range of Han codepoints has changed to:

2E80-2E99 2E9B-2EF3 2F00-2FD5 3005-3005 3007-3007 3021-3029 3038-303B 3400-4DB5 4E00-9FCC F900-FA6D FA70-FAD9 20000-2A6D6 2A700-2B734 2B740-2B81D 2F800-2FA1D 

I also seem to recall that Vim has difficulties expressing astral code points, which are needed for this to work correctly. For example, using the flexible \x{HHHHHH} notation from Java 7 or Perl, you would have:

[\x{2E80}-\x{2E99}\x{2E9B}-\x{2EF3}\x{2F00}-\x{2FD5}\x{3005}-\x{3005}\x{3007}-\x{3007}\x{3021}-\x{3029}\x{3038}-\x{303B}\x{3400}-\x{4DB5}\x{4E00}-\x{9FCC}\x{F900}-\x{FA6D}\x{FA70}-\x{FAD9}\x{20000}-\x{2A6D6}\x{2A700}-\x{2B734}\x{2B740}-\x{2B81D}\x{2F800}-\x{2FA1D}]

Notice that the last part of the range is \x{2F800}-\x{2FA1D}, which is beyond the BMP. But what you really need is \p{Han} (meaning, \p{Script=Han}). This again shows that regex dialects that don’t support at least Level 1 of UTS#18: Basic Unicode Support are inadequate for working with Unicode. Vim’s regexes are inadequate for basic Unicode work.


EDITED TO ADD

Here’s the program that dumps out the ranges of code points that apply to any given Unicode script.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
#
# uniscrange - given a Unicode script name, print out the ranges of code 
#              points that apply.
# Tom Christiansen <tchrist@perl.com>

use strict;
use warnings;

use Unicode::UCD qw(charscript);

for my $arg (@ARGV) {
    print "$arg: " if @ARGV > 1;
    dump_range($arg);
}

sub dump_range {
    my($scriptname) = @_;

    my $alist = charscript($scriptname);
    unless ($alist) {
        warn "Unknown script '$scriptname'\n";
        return;
    }

    for my $aref (@$alist) {
        my($start, $stop, $name) = @$aref;
        die "got $name, not $scriptname\n" unless $name eq $scriptname;
        printf "%04X-%04X ", $start, $stop;
    }
    print "\n";

}

Its answers depend on which version of Perl — and thus, which version of Unicode — you’re running it against.

$ perl5.8.8 ~/uniscrange Latin Greek
Latin: 0041-005A 0061-007A 00AA-00AA 00BA-00BA 00C0-00D6 00D8-00F6 00F8-01BA 01BB-01BB 01BC-01BF 01C0-01C3 01C4-0241 0250-02AF 02B0-02B8 02E0-02E4 1D00-1D25 1D2C-1D5C 1D62-1D65 1D6B-1D77 1D79-1D9A 1D9B-1DBF 1E00-1E9B 1EA0-1EF9 2071-2071 207F-207F 2090-2094 212A-212B FB00-FB06 FF21-FF3A FF41-FF5A 
Greek: 0374-0375 037A-037A 0384-0385 0386-0386 0388-038A 038C-038C 038E-03A1 03A3-03CE 03D0-03E1 03F0-03F5 03F6-03F6 03F7-03FF 1D26-1D2A 1D5D-1D61 1D66-1D6A 1F00-1F15 1F18-1F1D 1F20-1F45 1F48-1F4D 1F50-1F57 1F59-1F59 1F5B-1F5B 1F5D-1F5D 1F5F-1F7D 1F80-1FB4 1FB6-1FBC 1FBD-1FBD 1FBE-1FBE 1FBF-1FC1 1FC2-1FC4 1FC6-1FCC 1FCD-1FCF 1FD0-1FD3 1FD6-1FDB 1FDD-1FDF 1FE0-1FEC 1FED-1FEF 1FF2-1FF4 1FF6-1FFC 1FFD-1FFE 2126-2126 10140-10174 10175-10178 10179-10189 1018A-1018A 1D200-1D241 1D242-1D244 1D245-1D245

$ perl5.10.0 ~/uniscrange Latin Greek
Latin: 0041-005A 0061-007A 00AA-00AA 00BA-00BA 00C0-00D6 00D8-00F6 00F8-01BA 01BB-01BB 01BC-01BF 01C0-01C3 01C4-0293 0294-0294 0295-02AF 02B0-02B8 02E0-02E4 1D00-1D25 1D2C-1D5C 1D62-1D65 1D6B-1D77 1D79-1D9A 1D9B-1DBE 1E00-1E9B 1EA0-1EF9 2071-2071 207F-207F 2090-2094 212A-212B 2132-2132 214E-214E 2184-2184 2C60-2C6C 2C74-2C77 FB00-FB06 FF21-FF3A FF41-FF5A 
Greek: 0374-0375 037A-037A 037B-037D 0384-0385 0386-0386 0388-038A 038C-038C 038E-03A1 03A3-03CE 03D0-03E1 03F0-03F5 03F6-03F6 03F7-03FF 1D26-1D2A 1D5D-1D61 1D66-1D6A 1DBF-1DBF 1F00-1F15 1F18-1F1D 1F20-1F45 1F48-1F4D 1F50-1F57 1F59-1F59 1F5B-1F5B 1F5D-1F5D 1F5F-1F7D 1F80-1FB4 1FB6-1FBC 1FBD-1FBD 1FBE-1FBE 1FBF-1FC1 1FC2-1FC4 1FC6-1FCC 1FCD-1FCF 1FD0-1FD3 1FD6-1FDB 1FDD-1FDF 1FE0-1FEC 1FED-1FEF 1FF2-1FF4 1FF6-1FFC 1FFD-1FFE 2126-2126 10140-10174 10175-10178 10179-10189 1018A-1018A 1D200-1D241 1D242-1D244 1D245-1D245

You can use the corelist -a Unicode command to see which version of Unicode goes with which version of Perl. Here is selected output:

$ corelist -a Unicode
  v5.8.8     4.1.0     
  v5.10.0    5.0.0     
  v5.12.2    5.2.0     
  v5.14.0    6.0.0     
  v5.16.0    6.1.0     
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/[\x{2E80}-\x{2E99}] ==> E16: Invalid range –  kev Apr 30 '12 at 12:29
    
@kev I quite explicitly stated that I was using the \x{HHHHHH} notation (which Vim does not understand) so that I could specify arbitrary code points in any plane, not just in the the BMP the way \uHHHH (which Vim does understand) provides for. It was necessary to do so to understand the problem. –  tchrist Apr 30 '12 at 12:52
    
@kev Java7 also uses that notation for its regexes. It’s necessary for code points that are above the BMP. Note that the answer you accepted neglects the non-BMP ranges in \p{Han}, which as of Unicode v6.1 are 20000-2A6D6, 2A700-2B734, 2B740-2B81D, and 2F800-2FA1D. Would you like the program I wrote that generates those ranges for you? –  tchrist Apr 30 '12 at 12:57
    
@kev I’ve updated the answer to include the program that shows the script ranges. –  tchrist Apr 30 '12 at 13:11
    
Thank. Very helpful. –  kev Apr 30 '12 at 13:14

It seems that Vim ranges are somehow limited to the same high byte, because /[\u4E00-\u4eFF] works fine. If you don't mind the mess, try:

/[\u4e00-\u4eff\u4f00-\u4fff\u5000-\u50ff\u5100-\u51ff\u5200-\u52ff\u5300-\u53ff\u5400-\u54ff\u5500-\u55ff\u5600-\u56ff\u5700-\u57ff\u5800-\u58ff\u5900-\u59ff\u5a00-\u5aff\u5b00-\u5bff\u5c00-\u5cff\u5d00-\u5dff\u5e00-\u5eff\u5f00-\u5fff\u6000-\u60ff\u6100-\u61ff\u6200-\u62ff\u6300-\u63ff\u6400-\u64ff\u6500-\u65ff\u6600-\u66ff\u6700-\u67ff\u6800-\u68ff\u6900-\u69ff\u6a00-\u6aff\u6b00-\u6bff\u6c00-\u6cff\u6d00-\u6dff\u6e00-\u6eff\u6f00-\u6fff\u7000-\u70ff\u7100-\u71ff\u7200-\u72ff\u7300-\u73ff\u7400-\u74ff\u7500-\u75ff\u7600-\u76ff\u7700-\u77ff\u7800-\u78ff\u7900-\u79ff\u7a00-\u7aff\u7b00-\u7bff\u7c00-\u7cff\u7d00-\u7dff\u7e00-\u7eff\u7f00-\u7fff\u8000-\u80ff\u8100-\u81ff\u8200-\u82ff\u8300-\u83ff\u8400-\u84ff\u8500-\u85ff\u8600-\u86ff\u8700-\u87ff\u8800-\u88ff\u8900-\u89ff\u8a00-\u8aff\u8b00-\u8bff\u8c00-\u8cff\u8d00-\u8dff\u8e00-\u8eff\u8f00-\u8fff\u9000-\u90ff\u9100-\u91ff\u9200-\u92ff\u9300-\u93ff\u9400-\u94ff\u9500-\u95ff\u9600-\u96ff\u9700-\u97ff\u9800-\u98ff\u9900-\u99ff\u9a00-\u9aff\u9b00-\u9bff\u9c00-\u9cff\u9d00-\u9dff\u9e00-\u9eff\u9f00-\u9fff]
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This is a good solution. Thanks. –  kev Apr 28 '12 at 14:34
    
Vim freezes when I search this pattern. But I works. Thanks again! –  kev Apr 30 '12 at 12:30
1  
@kev Yes, it is explained in help: when you use a collection, character that is to be checked for a match is checked against all characters in collection. It is not checking against being in certain range. So the above regex performs twenty thousand nine hundred ten checks for each character. Of course, vim freezes. –  ZyX Apr 30 '12 at 19:31

I played around with this quite a bit and in vim the following seems to find all the Kanji characters in my Kanji/Pinyin/English text:

[^!-~0-9 aāáǎăàeēéěèiīíǐĭìoōóǒŏòuūúǔùǖǘǚǜ]
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