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I just generalized the problem in the title.

The actual problem I'm solving is this. I'm making a website and I need to fill a "Random Article" section of the site. This random article has to be displayed for the whole day. So I'm trying to come up with an algorithm that would choose 1 element from the database with an article based on today's date.

I've a database of about 100,000 articles.

Let's say todays date is 2012-04-28. I could perhaps sum up the numbers to come with an ID of the article to choose. In this case 2012+4+28 = 2044. But this a problem that 2012-04-28 and 2013-04-27 would display the same article.

I also don't want the algorithm to choose the same article twice given two nearby days. I want the choice to be unique. (Ideally i'd like it to be a generating function that covers the whole 100,000 articles given 100,000 consecutive days.)

I can't think of a different way to choose an article based on date. Any ideas?

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Do you need to choose a random article, or can you choose the articles sequentially? –  Adam Liss Apr 28 '12 at 14:32
    
@AdamLiss best if they are chosen randomly. –  bodacydo Apr 28 '12 at 16:17

3 Answers 3

You could just concatenate the date making 2012-04-28 become 20120428.

I know that the number is larger than the amount of articles that you have in your DB, but then you could just subtract the day you start displaying these articles and show article 20120428-20120428=0 today and article 20120429-20120428=1 tomorrow.

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Very nice solution, similar to @Adam Liss's. However as I mentioned in the comment above, it would choose the articles sequentially. I'd rather have them chosen randomly. Can you think of a way to turn this sequential algorithm into a random one? –  bodacydo Apr 28 '12 at 16:18
    
I'm remembering something about field theory, Z_p and such, integers modulo a prime, something about a generator and how raising it to prime number produces all elements in Z_p. I wonder if I could use this number theory stuff here. I'm not that good to figure it out on my own though. –  bodacydo Apr 28 '12 at 16:24

If you simply count the number of days after your web site goes live, then your problem comes down to mapping the sequence 1, 2, 3, ... n to a random sequence.

An easy way to do this is to create an array that contains the numbers from 1 to n in random order. Then, for each day i, you can use the ith element.

For example, suppose n = 4 and you've filled the array randomly like this:

a[0] = 3
a[1] = 1
a[2] = 4
a[3] = 2

The array has the random sequence 3, 1, 4, 2, so as the days pass, you'd choose article 3, then article 1, then article 4, and finally article 2.

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That's a nice solution. I didn't think of that. However it would choose articles sequentially. I'd rather have them chosen randomly. –  bodacydo Apr 28 '12 at 16:17
    
@bodacydo That's why you'd fill the array with the sequence in a random order: that creates a random sequence. Then, as you iterate through the array, you keep advancing to the next random number in the sequence. I'll clarify the answer. –  Adam Liss Apr 28 '12 at 16:23
    
I'm remembering something about field theory, Z_p and such, integers modulo a prime, something about a generator and how raising it to prime number produces all elements in Z_p. I wonder if I could use this number theory stuff here. I'm not that good to figure it out on my own though. –  bodacydo Apr 28 '12 at 16:25
    
I could also generate a list of 100,000 numbers, permute the list, and then apply the algorithm that you suggested to the list, choosing 1 element every day. However that would require me to store 100,000 IDs in a random order somewhere. 100,000 IDs is 400,000 bytes == 400KB of data! Not much but still I've to put it somewhere, either a new table, or external file. –  bodacydo Apr 28 '12 at 16:26
1  
I just got a very nice idea - I could find a pseudorandom number generator with periodicity roughly 100,000 (or try constructing one myself), then always before using it seed it with my_seed, and then given day n, generate nth random number. However I see one major problem with this approach, to get to 100,000th element, I'd have to call my function 100,000 times, which is upsetting. –  bodacydo Apr 28 '12 at 16:55

I would approach this problem differently. I'd assign each article a unique number and pick a random number from the range [1..number of articles]. This gets you past the difficulty of generating a valid random date.

One way to assign a number would be to sort the articles by date posted, then assign the oldest article 1, and so on. If these articles are stored in a database, the primary key of the database would very likely suit your needs.

As an aside, the way the articles are assigned numbers doesn't really matter. The set of articles doesn't even need to be sorted for this idea to work (for example, if they were stored in an unordered hash table).

You may need to call the generator function more than once in the rare case it returns a number for an article that's no longer available (maybe hidden or deleted). However, assuming the number of unavailable articles is small, this scenario won't occur very often and won't be a performance concern.

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Upon review, this is similar to @Adam Liss's but doesn't involve the date in the mapping of the number to the article. –  neontapir Sep 26 '12 at 22:28

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