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How do you split a list into evenly sized chunks in Python?
python: convert “5,4,2,4,1,0” into [[5, 4], [2, 4], [1, 0]]

[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]

->

[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]

Are there simple way to do it, without explicit 'for'?

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marked as duplicate by Lattyware, sth, senderle, the wolf, dawg Apr 28 '12 at 17:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What should happen if the number of items in the list isn't evenly divisible by the chunk size? –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 28 '12 at 15:19
1  
This has been asked before –  dawg Apr 28 '12 at 17:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 29 down vote accepted
>>> x = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
>>> zip(*[iter(x)]*3)
[(1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7, 8, 9)]

Here is a link to the question that asks how this works:

How does zip(*[iter(s)]*n) work in Python?

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2  
Explain it a little bit too :P –  Serdalis Apr 28 '12 at 14:30
1  
It has been explained before but i will find a link. –  jamylak Apr 28 '12 at 14:30
1  
That is exceedingly clever, but I guess it is pythonic. –  ddaa Apr 28 '12 at 14:54
6  
Note that this discards incomplete chunks. If you try it with x = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7] then you only get two chunks, and the 7 is discarded. (Of course, this might be what you want, but if it isn't, beware!) –  gimboland Jun 14 '13 at 0:00
    
@gimboland that input is invalid because there are no possible even chunks from that –  jamylak Jun 14 '13 at 1:23

You can use numpy.reshape here as well:

import numpy as np

x = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9])

new_x = np.reshape(x, (3,3))

Result:

>>> new_x
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [4, 5, 6],
       [7, 8, 9]])
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Here's a much less "clever" way of doing it with recursion:

from itertools import chain

def groupsof(n, xs):
    if len(xs) < n:
        return [xs]
    else:
        return chain([xs[0:n]], groupsof(n, xs[n:]))

print list(groupsof(3, [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13]))
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>>> map(None,*[iter(s)]*3)
[(1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7, 8, 9)]
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1  
This just seems like a less readable version of my code... –  jamylak Apr 28 '12 at 15:23
    
This exact code is provided in the accepted answer in the link in jamylak's post. –  Akavall Apr 28 '12 at 15:28
    
I guess it's okay to know that it works but I wouldn't recommend using it because of what I said before. –  jamylak Apr 28 '12 at 15:32
4  
@jamylak, actually, this does someting slightly different from what your code does. Look at the result of map(None, *[iter(range(10))]*3)) vs zip(*[iter(range(10))]*3). Since the OP didn't specify which behavior he or she wants, this answer is valid. –  senderle Apr 28 '12 at 15:35
1  
@senderle for that i would use izip_longest. That is also used in the example for itertools –  jamylak Apr 28 '12 at 15:36

If you really want the sub elements to be lists vs tuples:

In [9]: [list(t) for t in zip(*[iter(range(1,10))]*3)]
Out[9]: [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]

Or, if you want to include the left over elements that would be truncated by zip, use a slice syntax:

In [16]: l=range(14)

In [17]: [l[i:i+3] for i in range(0,len(l),3)]
Out[17]: [[0, 1, 2], [3, 4, 5], [6, 7, 8], [9, 10, 11], [12, 13]]
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I like this version –  Arsham Apr 16 at 10:12

protected by jamylak Apr 8 '13 at 7:38

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